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NEWS: FIBER IN YOUR DIET

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A new meta-analysis examines 40 years’ worth of research in an attempt to find out the ideal amount of fiber that we should consume to prevent chronic disease and premature mortality.

The analysis also revealed that the amount of fiber that people should consume daily to gain these health benefits is 25–29 grams (g). By comparison, adults in the United States consume 15 g of fiber daily, on average.

Overall, the research found that people who consume the most fiber in their diet are 15–30 percent less likely to die prematurely from any cause or a cardiovascular condition, compared with those who eat the least fiber.

Consuming foods rich in fiber correlated with a 16–24 percent lower incidence of coronary heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, and colon cancer.

Fiber-rich foods include whole grains, vegetables, fruit, and pulses, such as peas, beans, lentils, and chickpeas.

HIGH FIBER LEGUMES: The following are some of the best legumes for fiber:

· Navy beans

Navy beans are one of the richest sources of fiber. They are also high in protein. Add navy beans to salads, curries, or stews for an extra fiber and protein boost.

Fiber content: Navy beans contain 10.5 g per 100 g (31.3 percent of AI).

· Pinto Beans

Pinto beans are a popular U.S. staple. People can eat pinto beans whole, mashed or as refried beans. Along with their high-fiber content, pinto beans are a great source of calcium and iron.

Fiber content: Pinto beans contain 9 g of fiber per 100 g (26.8 percent of AI).

· Black beans

Black beans contain good amounts of iron and magnesium. They are also a great source of plant-based protein.

If people who follow a vegan diet combine black beans with rice, they will be getting all nine essential amino acids.

Fiber content: Black beans contain 8.7 g of fiber per 100 g (25.9 percent of AI).

· Split peas

Split peas are a great source of iron and magnesium. They go well in casseroles, curries, and dahl.

Fiber content: Split peas contain 8.3 g of fiber per 100 g (24.7 percent of AI).

· Lentils

There are many types of lentils, including red lentils and French lentils. They make a great addition to couscous, quinoa dishes, or dahl.

Fiber content: Lentils contain 7.9 g of fiber per 100 g (23.5 percent of AI).

· Mung beans

Mung beans are a versatile source of potassium, magnesium, and vitamin B-6.

When dried and ground, people can use mung bean flour to make pancakes.

Fiber content: Mung beans contain 7.6 g of fiber per 100 g (22.6 percent of AI).

· Adzuki beans

Adzuki beans are used in Japanese cuisine to make red bean paste, which is a traditional sweet. People can also boil these fragrant, nutty beans and eat them plain.

Fiber content: Adzuki beans contain 7.3 g of fiber per 100 g (21.7 percent of AI).

· Lima Beans

Not only are lima beans a great source of fiber, but they are also high in plant protein.

Fiber content: Lima beans contain 7 g of fiber per 100 g (20.8 percent of AI).

· Chickpeas

Chickpeas, or garbanzo beans, are a popular source of plant-based protein and fiber. They are also full of iron, vitamin B-6, and magnesium.

Use this legume as a base for hummus and falafel.

Fiber content: Chickpeas contain 6.4 g of fiber per 100 g (19 percent of AI).

· Kidney Beans

Kidney beans are a rich source of iron. Kidney beans are a great addition to chili, casseroles, and salads.

Fiber content: Kidney beans contain 6.4 g of fiber per 100 g (19 percent of AI).

HIGH FIBER VEGETABLES

· Artichoke

Artichokes are packed with vitamins C and K, plus calcium, and folate.

Fiber content: One medium artichoke contains 6.9 g of fiber (20.5 percent of AI).

· Potato

As a staple vegetable, potatoes are a good source of B vitamins plus vitamin C and magnesium.

Fiber content: One large potato, baked in its skin, contains 6.3 g of fiber (18.8 percent of AI).

· Sweet potato

Sweet potatoes are one of the starchy vegetables. They are high in vitamin A.

Fiber content: One large sweet potato, baked in its skin, contains 5.9 g of fiber (17.6 percent of AI).

· Parsnips

Parsnips are a good source of vitamins C and K, as well as B vitamins, calcium, and zinc.

Fiber content: One boiled parsnip contains 5.8 g of fiber (17.3 percent of AI).

· Winter squash

Winter squash vegetables are a bountiful source of vitamins A and C.

Fiber content: One cup of winter squash contains 5.7 g of fiber (17 percent of AI).

· Broccoli

Broccoli is a cruciferous vegetable that is high in vitamins C and A. Cruciferous vegetables also have lots of antioxidant polyphenols.

Fiber content: One cup of cooked broccoli florets contains 5.1 g of fiber (15.2 percent of AI).

· Pumpkin

Pumpkin is a popular vegetable and source of vitamins A and K and calcium. People use it in sweet and savory dishes.

Fiber content: A standard portion of canned pumpkin contains 3.6 g of fiber (10.7 percent of AI).

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Author: txnaturalpediatrics

By training, I am a American Board Certified Pediatrician. But in my younger years I grew up with natural alternatives. As a mom I have tried to incorporate both for my kids and it has worked wonders. And finally, as I am studying natural & alternative medicines, I realize the beauty and wisdom of living closer to earth. Hence in my practice I integrate both...for acute ailments I follow American Academy of Pediatrics recommendation but for simple and/or chronic conditions I prefer natural alternatives. In western training we were raised to think that "health is the absence of symptoms and problems". But eastern sensibilities has educated me that "Health is state that allows one to use the full capabilities of their body, mind and intellect. Therefore, healthy living is a balanced state of well being: physically, mentally, socially and spiritually." This implies that healing is not a "one-pill-fits-all", but a personalized experience.

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