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What do you know about mental health

Here are facts about mental illness that everyone should know.

1. Mental health disorders are more common than you would think

We often think that mental health is something that affects others and couldn’t possibly be something we or our loved ones will face one day. And while that thought sure sounds comforting, in reality, mental illness is more common than you think.

For one, the most common disorder is anxiety and panic disorder, with an estimated 18% of the population in the US alone suffering from the illness according to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America. Of these, only 36% seek treatment, despite the fact that it’s among the most treatable mental health issues.

The numbers speak for themselves. According to MentalHealth.gov, 1 in 5 American adults had a serious mental health issue at some point in their lives, and 1 in 25 live with a major mental illness (e.g. bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, major depression). Finally, suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the US, taking twice as many lives as homicide each year.

2. It’s possible to prevent mental illness

It’s certainly true that there is a genetic and hereditary component to mental health problems, but these are only one of the contributing factors that make a person susceptible to specific mental illnesses. The remaining factors affecting mental health, such as trauma, a safe and supportive environment, a healthy diet, abstinence from alcohol and recreational drugs, and an active lifestyle are all environmental, and can be as important as the hereditary predisposition.

That’s why it’s of key importance to raise children and adolescents in a safe and positive environment and prioritize a healthy lifestyle, especially if you know that a child is at risk of developing mental illness.

3. Weakness or strength of character has nothing to do with mental health

One common misconception about mental illness is that it stems from a lack of character and self-discipline, and if people suffering from a mental condition would try harder, they could be back to normal. This misconception stems from the belief that mental conditions originate from emotions, so, for example, a person who suffers from depression is just sad or lazy, or someone who is in mania is just hot-headed or angry.

Unfortunately, things are not so simple, as no amount of self-discipline can undo the trauma or regulate the neurochemical disturbances in a person’s brain, both of which are major physical contributing factors of mental illness. For this reason alone, don’t demand from a person with a mental issue or from yourself to just snap out of it, seek professional help instead.

4. It’s possible to fully recover from mental illness

Another persistent misconception about mental illness is that it’s irreversible, meaning that a person suffering from mental health issues will never recover. This, too, isn’t true, and many patients recover completely or get much better if they get treatment and the social support they require.

The likelihood of full recovery will depend on the type of condition, the stage of development of said condition, as well as the treatment and support the patient receives. That’s why it’s always good to turn to mental health professionals and seek treatment as soon as possible.

5. People suffering from mental illness can hold full-time jobs just like everyone else

Like we’ve mentioned previously, the number of people suffering from mental health issues is massive. In fact, nearly everyone will suffer from some kind of mental illness at some point in their lives, and as many as 1 in 10 young people have had major depression. Needless to say, most of these people have lives, families, and jobs.

Many psychiatric patients are productive and manage to hold full-time jobs without frequent absenteeism and other negative side effects of their condition, given that they manage their condition. In addition, having a steady income and maintaining social activity has been found to be highly beneficial to persons suffering from mental health issues.

6. Children, as all other ages, can and do experience mental health issues

Many mental illnesses manifest themselves in the form of early signs and symptoms during childhood or youth, and there are a few disorders, such as autism, that begin in early childhood. It has been estimated that 50% of all mental illnesses exhibit the first symptoms before the age of 14, and 75% of them begin before the age of 24.

It is unfortunate that most of these early symptoms don’t get the attention they require, and it is not until the illness reaches its developed stages that the patient seeks treatment. On the bright side, the statistics of the early diagnosis are improving, and an increasing number of patients have a better prognosis and have a chance for a better life as a result.

7. Stigma is one of the biggest issues for people with mental health problems

Social acceptance is incredibly important for anyone, really, so it’s not surprising that people suffering from mental health issues are often ashamed to discuss their condition with other people. Patients are afraid to be diagnosed because this may cost them their job, their family and their social circle.

But the adverse effects of stigma related to the mental health field, in general, are a lot more far-reaching, as many patients refuse or deter the necessary treatment due to the fear of being labeled ‘crazy’ or ‘psycho’, which decreases their chance of full recovery. Acceptance and understanding from the patient’s social connections are key in helping their recovery and long term wellbeing, as well as preventing suicide.

8. Genetics alone cannot trigger mental illness

Contrary to popular belief, the vast majority of mental conditions are not genetic, all of them are acquired, though some have a stronger genetic component than others. Even autism, the first symptoms of which are often exhibited as early as 8 months, occurs as a result of both genetic predisposition and abnormalities during pregnancy and childbirth, which makes autism an inborn, but not a genetic condition.

The genetic component for other mental illnesses, such as bipolar disorder, depression, schizophrenia, etc., is even smaller than that, and as a result, these conditions are preventable, much like many acquired physical conditions, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cirrhosis or type 2 diabetes.

9. Exercise has a surprisingly beneficial effect on mental health

Many people underestimate the beneficial effect of good lifestyle changes on mental health. The reality is, however, that maintaining a physically and socially active life, having a healthy diet and even spending time in nature can help your symptoms.

For one, exercise has been found to improve the symptoms of anxiety, depression, and ADHD, likely because it is known to relieve stress, boosts your mood and improves sleep. Needless to say, all of the activities and habits we mentioned are also good preventative methods.

10. There is no link between creativity and mental illness

If we were to ask you to name at least a few famous creatives suffering from mental illness, we’re more than sure that you’d be able to come up with several examples off the top of your head: van Gogh, Hemingway, Sinatra, the list goes on… This prompts the question, "Is there a link between mental illness and creativity?"

Luckily, we have a ready answer, and it’s a definitive ‘No’, and there is nearly a century’s worth of scientific studies to back up this claim. People suffering from mental illness are not more creative than those who don’t, and conversely, artistic minds are not more likely to suffer from a mental condition than non-creatives. Lastly, if you, as a creative, will take medications to address a mental issue, it will not directly affect your level of creativity.

11. Mental illness and intellectual disability or brain damage are not the same

This is another popular misconception, and we recognize where it comes from, as it often happens that people with brain damage or cognitive deficits have mental health issues, and it’s also the case that mental illness in its advanced stages can cause brain damage.

What further complicates this question is that many brain disorders can be accompanied by psychotic episodes or mood disorders. For example, advanced Parkinson’s disease often causes hallucinations, delusions and psychosis. Still, this doesn’t mean that neurological and psychiatric illnesses are the same, it merely showcases that structural and functional changes in the brain influence our mental health.

12. Sleep deprivation affects mental health

We live in a society that often values productivity and hard work more than health. The truth is that by depriving yourself of sleep or sleeping too much, you can set yourself up for danger.

In fact, research from Harvard University has shown that 65–90% of adults with major depression also suffer from sleep problems. This is because REM sleep promotes learning, memory and emotional wellbeing, and the lack thereof, as the authors suggest, can worsen or even potentially trigger psychiatric illness. So, fluff up your pillows and have a good night’s sleep.

Source: Internet

The views expressed in this article should not be considered as a substitute for a physician’s advice. Always make sure to seek a doctor or a professional’s advice before proceeding with the home treatment plan.


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How much water should we drink?

You’ve probably heard the claim that drinking eight glasses of water per day is important for health. Water, of course, is the most important nutrient for our body, and maintaining proper hydration is extremely crucial to good health. However, simply drinking eight glasses of water a day and feeling that you’ve done your job won’t always be helpful.

Our water needs are dependent on several key factors and vary from person to person. Here, we have listed some of the critical elements that determine an individual’s daily water intake. Take a look.

1. Your age

Health experts say that an average healthy adult should drink around 4 to 6 glasses or about 2 liters of water every day. That should keep your body sufficiently hydrated.

Seniors, however, may need increased amounts of fluid to remain hydrated. We mustn’t forget that aging adults often need reminders and encouragement to drink enough water to avoid dehydration. Moreover, seniors lose water faster with age. Their sense of thirst also decreases with age and hence older adults have to be extra mindful of their water intake.

An important point to remember here is that older people are also at a higher risk of overhydration as they have less ability to conserve sodium. Insufficient amounts of dietary sodium, along with excess fluids, can lead to dangerous overhydration in aging adults. The recommended daily water intake for seniors is at least one cup of water for every 20 pounds (9 kg) of weight or at least 1.7 liters of fluid per 24 hours.

2. Environment

Where you live significantly impacts the amount of water you should consume. For example, hot or humid weather can make you sweat and requires an additional intake of fluid. Indoor heating can increase sweating and makes your skin lose moisture during the winter season and you would hence need more water to make up for that loss. Also, those living in altitudes greater than 2,500 meters (8,202 ft) are more prone to extra urination and more rapid breathing. This may lead to a greater fluid loss and consequently an increased need for water.

3. Illnesses or health conditions

If you have an infection or a fever, your body may lose water by as much as 200 ml per day for a rise of each degree Celsius in body temperature. Vomiting or diarrhea can also cause you to lose fluids rapidly. In such cases, you will need to drink more water and may even require oral rehydration solutions. Other conditions such as diabetes, bladder infections, urinary tract stones, gout, and constipation may also require enhanced water intake. However, not all health conditions need you to take more water. For instance, heart failure and some types of kidney, liver, and adrenal diseases tend to damage the excretion of water and may require you to lower your water consumption.

4. Pregnancy or breast-feeding

Women who are expecting or breastfeeding generally need additional fluids to remain properly hydrated. This is because the body is working for two (or more).

The Institute of Medicine recommends that pregnant women should drink 2.4 liters (about 10 glasses of 250ml) of fluids per day and women who breastfeed should drink at least 2.71 liters of water and additional fluids daily depending on their thirst (about 12 glasses of 250ml).

5. Exercise or physical activity

It goes without saying that exercising or engaging in any activity that makes you sweat will also mean that you need to drink extra water to make up for that loss. Ideally, an extra 1.5 to 2.5 cups of water should be enough for short bouts of exercise. However, if your exercise lasts for more than an hour, you would obviously require more water. The additional fluid you would need would depend on the amount of sweat you lose during the exercise, its duration, and the kind of activity you are involved in. If you are engaging in long bouts of extreme exercise, it would be better to use a sports drink that contains sodium as that will help replace the sodium lost in sweat, too. Also, if you are active during the day or your work involves standing or walking a lot, you would need more water than someone who sits at a desk all day. For these people, an extra 2-3 glasses of water daily should be enough.

6. Your diet

Your water intake is also related to the kind of diet you follow. For instance, if you drink a lot of coffee and other caffeinated beverages, you are bound to lose extra water as a result of caffeine’s diuretic effect. Also, if your diet is high in salty, spicy, or sugary foods, you should increase your water intake by a little bit. More water would also be needed if your diet doesn’t include a lot of hydrating foods that are high in water such as fresh or cooked fruits and vegetables. Another point to note is that people taking too little protein are not able to maintain sufficient amounts of water in the blood. One of the most important roles of protein is to hold onto fluid in the blood. Thus, these individuals should certainly make it a point to boost their water consumption.

Source: Internet

The views expressed in this article should not be considered as a substitute for a physician’s advice. Always make sure to seek a doctor or a professional’s advice before proceeding with the home treatment plan.


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10 Remedies For Wheezing

Here are 10 home remedies for wheezing:

1. Steam inhalation

Inhaling warm, moisture-rich air is a great way of clearing the sinuses and opening up the airways. All you need to do is boil some water, pour it into a large bowl and breathe in the steam. Place a hot towel over your head to trap in more moisture, and try adding a few drops of menthol or eucalyptus oil to the water to make the steam more powerful. You can also benefit from a sauna room or hot shower to loosen the congestion if needed.

2. Hot drinks

Hot drinks are excellent for loosening up congestion in the airways. Add a teaspoon of honey to a hot drink to reap its anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial benefits. Eating just one tablespoon of honey twice a day can also help to relieve throat congestion. Peppermint and other menthol teas also work well. Try experimenting with these different things to see which works best for you.

3. Breathing exercises

Wheezing caused by Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, bronchitis or allergies can be eased by doing breathing exercises. These include deep, regular inhalations and exhalations. A doctor or respiratory therapist can assist you in finding the most effective breathing techniques for you.

4. Humidifiers

There’s no denying that wheezing can get worse during the winter months, so consider investing in a humidifier. This will help to loosen congestion in the airways and reduce the severity of wheezing. You can even try adding peppermint or other oils into its water, however, you should check the instructions before adding anything other than water.

5. Air filters

Polluted air can contribute significantly to wheezing, as can allergens. A home air filter can reduce the presence of irritants that can cause wheezing and other breathing problems.

6. Identifying and removing triggers

Certain triggers, such as stress or allergens, can make chronic illnesses and asthma worse, so identifying and being in control of them is a great idea. For instance, individuals with chronic respiratory conditions might take allergy medication and avoid allergy triggers.

7. Allergy medications

Decongestants, corticosteroid tablets, and antihistamines can all help with keeping allergies under control. Nasal sprays can also help to relieve a tight chest, congestion, and inflammation. If you suffer from more severe allergies, note that you may require prescription allergy medication.

8. Allergy immunotherapy

Immunotherapy involves retraining the immune system to refrain from reacting to allergens. Allergy shots are the most common form of immunotherapy, and the technique can also be helpful for people with other chronic conditions such as COPD.

9. Bronchodilators

This type of medication is designed to relax the lungs and prevent the airways from narrowing, thus helping those with wheezing caused by COPD or asthma. Bronchodilators come in two forms, namely short-acting and long-acting. The former can halt an asthma or COPD attack, whereas the latter can relax the airways over the long-term.

10. Other medications

Wheezing caused by an underlying illness is often treatable with medication. Epinephrine or corticosteroids, for instance, can help individuals that experience wheezing due to a severe allergic reaction. Always discuss medications with your doctor prior to taking them, and also inform yourself on how various medications interact with one another.

When you should see a doctor

Diagnosing the cause of wheezing based on the symptoms alone can be quite difficult, so an individual should see a doctor if their wheezing is cause for concern.. A trip to the emergency room is in order if:

• An individual struggles with their breathing

• Their wheezing comes on suddenly

• It’s accompanied by other symptoms, such as chest pain

• If the individual is showing signs of anaphylaxis

Source: Internet

The views expressed in this article should not be considered as a substitute for a physician’s advice. Always make sure to seek a doctor or a professional’s advice before proceeding with the home treatment plan.


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THE BEAUTY OF JOJOBA OIL

Jojoba, with the botanical name Simmondsia chinensis, and also known as goat nut, deer nut, pignut, wild hazel, is native to the Southwestern United States. Jojoba oil has been known as one of the most powerful natural hair, skin and nail treatments in existence. Its efficacy is supported both by plenty of scientific evidence and a long-standing Native American tradition of using it to treat wounds and bruises.

What You Need to Know About Jojoba Oil

Jojoba oil is a common ingredient in many skincare products, but pure undiluted jojoba oil can be used and is widely available.

Jojoba oil can be used as a base oil and mixed with other essential oils to create custom oil blends targeting different skin and hair concerns.

The chemical makeup of jojoba oil is very similar to the natural oils our skin produces, which is why it is very hypoallergenic and well-tolerated by sensitive skins.

In manufacturing, jojoba is used as an ingredient in shampoo; lipstick; makeup; cleansing products; and in face, hand, and body lotions.

1. Use Jojoba Oil to Relieve Psoriasis and Eczema

Uncomfortable and often uncontrollable skin conditions associated with dry and flaking skin, such as psoriasis and eczema, usually improve after applying jojoba oil. This is because of anti inflammatory and healing properties of the oil. Apart from that, jojoba oil coats the problematic regions with a protective layer and relieves the itching and dryness associated with both conditions. Other skin conditions, such as rosacea and even diaper rash can also be treated with jojoba oil, as it is hypoallergenic and completely natural.

2. Pure Jojoba Oil Can Be Used For Anti-Aging

Jojoba oil is a miracle ingredient for aging skin because it alone can do things to your skin that otherwise would require a whole skincare regimen. Namely, it had been shown to:

  • reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles
  • treat hyperpigmentation
  • promote the production of collagen.

Hyperpigmentation, wrinkles and loss of volume and elasticity due to slow collagen production are the main causes of skin aging. Researchers believe this amazing effect is likely attributed to the abundance of antioxidants the oil contains.

3. Treat Cuts, Sunburns and Bruises With Jojoba Oil

The wound healing properties of jojoba oil have been known for centuries, and it was used by Native Americans for centuries to dress wounds, get rid of bruises and scarring. The sun-shielding capabilities of jojoba oil have been discovered more recently, but today, jojoba oil is one of the key ingredients in many natural sunscreens.

Studies suggests that antioxidants combined with vitamin E, both of which are contained in jojoba oil, can shield the skin from the sun. Combine this with the healing and antibacterial properties of jojoba oil we mentioned, and you will have a great treatment for sunburns.

4. Use Jojoba Oil to Treat Acne and Oiliness

As counterintuitive as it may sound, applying jojoba oil to oily and acne-prone skin is a good idea. This is because jojoba oil mimics the natural oils in your skin, tricking your body into believing that it already produced enough oil. The results are less unwanted oily shine, but also clearer skin, as pores clogged with excess oil is one of the leading causes of acne. Apart from that, jojoba oil has anti-inflammatory and soothing properties that will also calm down angry pimples and soothe your skin without causing any irritation like many chemically-derived acne products, such as benzoyl peroxide.

5. Jojoba Oil Is An Excellent Lip Balm

One has to be very careful with lip products, as parts of your lipsticks and lip balms may easily penetrate your body through your mouth. That’s why it’s best to use a natural and non-irritating product, like jojoba oil, that will both moisturize your lips without compromising your health.

6. Jojoba Oil Is Great For Shaving and Treating Razor Burn

The oil has an interesting waxy texture, which makes the razor glide smoothly during shaving, which assures that you minimize the likelihood of developing razor burn or getting nicks or cuts. And even when that does happen, cuts tend to heal faster and leave no scars because of the antibacterial and healing properties of the oil. Apart from that, you will need very little product compared to shaving cream.

7. Use Jojoba Oil As a Moisturizer for Dry Skin

Like most base oils, jojoba oil is a good moisturizing agent. Apart from simply moisturizing your skin, however, it is very effective at sealing the moisture in your skin, which is why it is especially beneficial when used on top of your usual skincare routine. This doesn’t mean that it cannot be used on its own, as it has been found to soften even the hardest and stubbornly dry skin areas, such as dry heels and elbows.

8. You Can Take Off Your Makeup and Cleanse Your Skin With Jojoba Oil

Unlike many harsh cleansers or makeup wipes, heavily-laden with detergents and foaming agents that irritate and age your skin, jojoba oil is effective, safe, noncomedogenic and gentle. You can use jojoba oil to remove makeup and wash your face, including the eye area.

After washing your face with jojoba oil, your skin will feel soft and hydrated, and not oily or dry. Using jojoba oil as a universal cleanser will not only make your skin look healthier and younger in the long run, but you will also buy less products, as you will need only jojoba oil to remove the makeup from your face, eyes and to clean your face.

9. Can Be Used to Treat Dry, Brittle Nails and Cuticles

Many women and men use jojoba oil to keep their nails healthy and strong. The vitamin E combined with the moisturizing and antibacterial properties of jojoba oil promotes nail growth, makes your nails less brittle and prevents breakage.

10. Use Jojoba Oil to Prevent Dandruff and Grow Healthy and Long Hair

A dry and itchy scalp is a common symptom of dandruff, but so is hair loss. Many hair products that target dandruff can help you get rid of the flakes, but they are too drying for your scalp, which can exacerbate the problem.

Jojoba oil is rich in vitamin E, zinc and selenium, all of which are known to fight dandruff, but it is protective and soothing for your skin as well, so it won’t dry out your scalp and hair. Finally, jojoba oil can moisturize your scalp, which will promote hair growth and decrease the amount of hair breakage.

Source: Internet

The views expressed in this article should not be considered as a substitute for a physician’s advice. Always make sure to seek a doctor or a professional’s advice before proceeding with the home treatment plan.


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RESEARCH NEWS: MEASLES ON THE RISE

Measles deaths worldwide swelled to their highest level in 23 years last year, according to a report released Thursday, a stunning rise for a vaccine-preventable disease. The global death tally for 2019 — 207,500 — was 50 percent higher than just three years earlier, according to the analysis, released jointly by the World Health Organization and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Takeaway: Don’t skip out on your child’s vaccination.


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NEWS: PREGNANCY AND COVID

According to the latest CDC report, Pregnant women who contract the coronavirus are more at risk for severe illness and death than non-pregnant women. The CDC said the findings may be due to the physiologic changes associated with pregnancy, including increased heart rate and oxygen consumption, decreased lung capacity, immunity changes and increased risk for thromboembolic disease.

Takeaway: The CDC advises pregnant women stay up to date with flu shots and prenatal care.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6944e3.htm?s_cid=mm6944e3_w


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LATEST NEWS: TAKE THE FLU SHOT. HERE’S WHY

Aside from wearing a mask, social distancing and practicing good hand hygiene, there is one thing you can do this fall that might lower your risk of contracting COVID-19: Get a flu shot. That’s the conclusion of a new study, which found that hospital workers who had been vaccinated against the flu were less likely to be infected with coronavirus than those who didn’t get the shot.

There’s a growing body of scientific evidence about a concept called "trained innate immunity" — simply, that vaccines may boost the "first responders" of the immune system overall, helping them fight off a range of pathogens and diseases.

Source: News, Internet


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LATEST NEWS: LONG-COVID

Have you heard of Long-Covid?

Many studies have revealed that one of the common symptoms of COVID is crippling fatigue. There can be other symptoms as well, such as – muscle ache, joint pain, breathing issues, constant headache, loss of smell and taste, a persistent cough. This not only affects your overall health but also leaves you with a severe mental illness as well. Depression and anxiety are the most common out of all. Researchers said that even the ones who have suffered from relatively mild impacts of COVID-19 can also be left with lifelong impact. The recent study added that patients who were experiencing more than five symptoms of coronavirus during the first week of their illness are more likely to develop long COVID. These five major symptoms can be difficulty in breathing, chronic headache, fatigue, muscle or body pain, and hoarse voice.

A recent study on long-COVID has also stated that the patients who were diagnosed with the virus won’t recover completely right away. The study was concluded that after intensive research being done on 4,000 coronavirus patients, almost 20% of them have recorded that they were still not feeling better after four weeks of recovery. The study went on to add that by the end of eight weeks, around 190 patients reported the lingering symptoms and by the end of 12 weeks, almost 100 patients confirmed that they were yet to fully recover.

Takeaway:

  1. Take Covid seriously
  2. Stay indoor
  3. Eat healthy
  4. Wear mask in public
  5. Exercise
  6. Drink plenty of fluids
  7. Get good rest


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Natural Anti-Inflammatory Teas

These 6 teas are not only tasty but also particularly suitable for calming the inflammatory processes in the body, be it chronic inflammation or an ordinary cold.

1. Turmeric tea is prepared from the roots of the turmeric plant. The roots are sold fresh, dried and, most often, in the form of a powder. Turmeric is common throughout Asia, and the bright golden roots of this plant were used in Ayurveda and traditional Chinese medicine for millennia. Powdered turmeric is also used as a natural dye.

Turmeric owes its anti-inflammatory effects to the active ingredient called curcumin which also gives the root its bright yellow color. Several studies using a turmeric supplement confirmed that it’s effective at relieving the pain and reducing inflammation caused by chronic inflammatory conditions, such as arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and heart disease.

Turmeric was also shown to help joint and muscle pain and increasing mobility both in osteoarthritis and post-exercise.

How to Prepare Turmeric Tea

Both turmeric spice and the fresh root can be used to prepare a delicious cup of turmeric tea. If you’re using fresh turmeric, you’ll need around 1 teaspoon of it to yield 1 large mug of tea, but if you’re using powdered turmeric, only half the amount or ½ teaspoon of the powder will suffice.

The preparation is simple as can be: simply simmer the water and turmeric mixture for around 10 minutes, and then drain into a cup. A little lemon and ginger complement the taste of this tea wonderfully.

2. Rosehip Tea (Rosa canina)

Rosehip tea is prepared from rose hips, small, bright red accessory fruits that grow on a particular type of rose, the dog rose. Rosa canina, the scientific name of the plant, is a widespread species of wild roses common all around Europe, northwest Africa, and western Asia, and its fruits were traditionally used to treat different ailments for millennia.

Rich in vitamin C, E and β-Carotene, these fruits were an important source of vitamins for the previous generations, especially during the winter, as dried rose hips can be stored for months without going bad. Only recently, however, we have discovered that rosehip is extremely rich in phenols, potent antioxidants that protect the cells from free radical damage.

Apart from that, the fruits contain several triterpene acids, which are known to prevent inflammation. Clinical trials have reported that rosehip powder can reduce pain in rheumatoid arthritis, one of the most common chronic inflammations.

How to Prepare Rose Hip Tea

Rosehip tea has a red hue and a fruity taste and can be enjoyed both warm and cool. Rosehip is usually sold dried, and both seedless and whole rose hips are available for purchase.

If you’re using seedless ones, simply toss around 7 pieces into a cup and steep them for up to 10 minutes, further draining the solids. If you have whole rose hips, you can boil the same amount on low heat for 10-15 minutes and drain them before transferring into a cup.

3. Green tea (Camellia sinensis)

All tea varieties are made of the leaves of the Camellia sinensis plant, but different growing and processing techniques yield different kinds of tea. Green teas are generally fermented and processed much less and more gently than red or black tea varieties, and so it contains a lot more antioxidants and other beneficial phytochemicals.

Green tea originated over 1.000 years ago in China, but ever since, it spread to other Asian countries and is popular worldwide today. The antioxidants we mentioned earlier are all polyphenols, and one of them, EGCG, is considered to be most effective at dealing with inflammation.

Japanese matcha tea is reported to have the highest amounts of EGCG, but most green teas will contain the beneficial ingredient as well. Research reports that EGCG can relieve IBD symptoms and can dampen the development of chronic degenerative diseases (Alzheimer’s, heart disease and some cancers).

Do keep in mind, however, that much like coffee, green tea contains caffeine, and so it can be harmful to certain patients, so talk to your doctor to check for any possible medication interactions.

Green tea comes in countless varieties, each having its own optimal brewing time and temperature, so follow the instructions on the packaging of the tea of your choice. We recommend opting for loose leaf teas, as those are generally made of younger tea leaves that have more antioxidants.

4. Fennel Tea (Foeniculum vulgare)

If you’re surprised to find out that fennel can be brewed into a tea, you’re likely familiar with the sweet and pungent vegetable that has its own health benefits, but not its seeds. Yes, both the seeds and the bulb of this Mediterranean plant are used for both culinary and medicinal purposes.

Fennel seeds, in particular, are rich in phenols, just like rosehip, and are often used to soothe digestive issues, particularly bloating, but it is also a potent pain reliever for menstrual cramps.

How to Prepare Fennel Tea

Fennel tea has a light yellow color and a sweet taste comparable to licorice. To prepare the tea, use 1-2 teaspoons of crushed fennel seeds and steep them for 10-15 minutes in a cup of hot water.

5. Ginger Tea (Zingiber officinale)

Ginger root needs no introduction, it’s one of the most popular tea ingredients and an extremely widespread spice. Ginger originated somewhere in Southeast Asia a long time ago, but today, its medicinal and culinary uses span worldwide and go far beyond traditional medicine and cuisine.

As of today, scientists discovered over 50 antioxidants in ginger, and these powerful phytochemicals can reduce the inflammation in your entire body. Studies involving diabetics, as well as patients suffering from osteoarthritis have observed a global reduction in many inflammation markers following a course of ginger supplements.

How to Prepare Ginger Tea

Although my favorite way to include ginger in my tea is to combine it with green tea or other herbal tea, you can prepare ginger tea alone as well.

If you’re using dried ginger, only ¼ – ½ teaspoon will suffice to prepare a cup of ginger tea. Steep the hot water and ginger mixture for 5 minutes. If you’re working with fresh ginger, around 1 tablespoon of the finely-sliced root will be enough to make 1 cup of ginger tea, but keep in mind that fresh ginger takes longer to brew around 10 minutes.

6. Tulsi (Ocimum tenuiflorum)

Also known as holy basil, this leafy plant native to the Indian subcontinent is a recurring ingredient in traditional medicine, especially in Ayurveda, where it’s known as a powerful adaptogen capable of helping the body to cope with emotional and environmental stress.

Modern research builds upon the traditional uses of the plant, with studies finding that tulsi has anti-inflammatory properties throughout the body, reducing blood sugar, blood pressure and LDL (bad) cholesterol levels. Other research found that the plant may also reduce swelling, decrease pain and inflammation by inhibiting enzymes that trigger the inflammatory response.

Finally, holy basil use was linked to a reduction of uric acid levels, alleviating pain in such conditions as gout and rheumatoid arthritis.

How to Prepare Tulsi Tea

Just 1 teaspoon of dried or fresh tulsi leaves will be enough to prepare a cup of tea. Simply immerse the herb into a cup of hot water and let it brew for 5 minutes.

Source: Internet

The views expressed in this article should not be considered as a substitute for a physician’s advice. Always make sure to seek a doctor or a professional’s advice before proceeding with the home treatment plan.


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The after-effects of Covid

A report published in February by the World Health Organization, based on preliminary data, suggested that in mild cases the median recovery time from Covid-19 is roughly two weeks from the onset of symptoms, and in severe or critical cases about three to six weeks. However, some of those who appear to have only mild illness initially also end up wrestling with symptoms, including fatigue, that linger for weeks or months. For many COVID survivors, testing negative is only half the battle won. COVID-19, as an infectious viral disease induces a heavy burden on the body and can leave patients suffering from symptoms long after recovery, no matter how mild or severe the infection was. Latest findings from the National Institute of Health, Britain (NIH) suggest that infection possibilities not just multiply post-COVID, but can also launch a multi-pronged attack, causing possibly a ‘rollercoaster’ of symptoms affecting all parts of the body and mind.

While doctors suggest that full recovery would require a month or two post-infection, SARS-COV-2 can also leave lasting consequences for the body’s vital organs, and require acute health monitoring for a long time. From heart trouble, thrombosis to nervous disorders, there are some COVID signs which could indicate signs of long term trouble. Take a look:

Heart damage

People who have made successful recoveries from COVID are returning to hospitals complaining of discomfort, fullness and cardiac complications, despite having no pre-existing history for heart problems. Some have also been asked to go for preventive screenings in the long run. In fact, incidents of myocardial injuries and infraction are some of the most common post-COVID issues people face and leave lasting damage in the long run.

According to doctors, the heart is one of the most vital organs impacted by COVID, and the implications can be harsh for everyone, no matter what age, severity, immunity or condition they have. At a preliminary level, it may lead to a decrease in heart function. This could be a result of either the systemic inflammatory response to infection or direct viral infection in the heart. Excessive pressure or stress put on the lungs or the heart can also result in myocarditis, which can lead to arrhythmia or even heart failure, in rare cases. Hence, it’s important to look out for preventive signs, keep a check on essential vitals and take action accordingly. Making changes to your diet and lifestyle, as part of rehabilitative care should also be paid attention to in the long run.

Lung fibrosis

Apart from the heart, one of the ways SARS-COV-2 virus implicates your body functioning is attacking the lungs and scarring the linings across the respiratory organs, leading to a build-up of a threatening condition, commonly known as fibrosis. COVID-19 is primarily a respiratory infection and reduces vital functioning. Due to avid viral multiplication and compromised immune response, the virus can start to ‘clot’ parts of your respiratory system and make normal functions, such as breathing difficult for some. It is for the same reason, many experience bouts of breathlessness, fatigue, low oxygen saturation weeks or months after testing negative. All of these are some of the early signs of lung fibrosis and require acute care and support. Failure to take care at the earliest can have potentially faltering consequences for a person’s health, especially for someone who is over the age of 50, or is prone to respiratory disorders.

Thrombosis

Thrombosis refers to the formation of blood clots in the blood vessels, which prohibits proper blood flow through the body’s circulatory system. In some cases, a reduced, or compromised blood flow could lead to an increased risk of some patients developing blood clots in the veins that cause leg clots (deep vein thrombosis) and pulmonary embolism. Experts say COVID-19, of all diseases, carries the most risk for increased rates of thrombosis for patients who are infected by it, as well as those who have tested negative. This is far more damaging for someone who is immuno-compromised or is suffering from diabetes. It is for the same reason that patients diagnosed with COVID and those who have pre-existing medical issues are advised to take blood thinners like aspirin on a prophylactic basis to cut down on chances of complications.

Kidney damage

Studies emerging out of New York have detailed that intensive cases of COVID-19 caused long-term damage to the kidneys, with over 60% of critically ill COVID patients requiring support in the long term. Not only is this finding unexpected, but researchers also say that it is also one of the most ‘silent’ signs of degradation in the body. Problems like chronic kidney disease (CKD), renal failure are also being commonly reported amongst patients who have recovered from COVID-19.

Cognitive decline and brain fog

Brain fog, anxiety, depression, PTSD and a decreased quality of life are some of the symptoms COVID long haulers are talking about. It is just another way how a simple ‘respiratory’ virus could pose long term trouble for your brain and nervous system. Though it isn’t entirely clear as to how and why does the COVID causing virus to impact your brain functioning, effects on your mental health could have lasting problems, and further slowdown recovery. Cured patients are also reporting symptoms of memory loss, confusion, forgetfulness, likening them to dementia-like symptoms.

Mood and fatigue

People who have severe symptoms of COVID-19 often have to be treated in a hospital’s intensive care unit, with mechanical assistance such as ventilators to breathe. Simply surviving this experience can make a person more likely to later develop post-traumatic stress syndrome, depression and anxiety.

Hearing loss

COVID-19 is known to affect blood flow — which means it can impact your hearing.

Much is still unknown about how COVID-19 will affect people over time. However, researchers recommend that doctors closely monitor people who have had COVID-19 to see how their organs are functioning after recovery.

It’s important to remember that most people who have COVID-19 recover quickly. But the potentially long-lasting problems from COVID-19 make it even more important to reduce the spread of the disease by following precautions such as wearing masks, avoiding crowds and keeping hands clean.

Source: TOI, Internet

The views expressed in this article should not be considered as a substitute for a physician’s advice. Always make sure to seek a doctor or a professional’s advice before proceeding with the home treatment plan.


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The after-effects of Covid

A report published in February by the World Health Organization, based on preliminary data, suggested that in mild cases the median recovery time from Covid-19 is roughly two weeks from the onset of symptoms, and in severe or critical cases about three to six weeks. However, some of those who appear to have only mild illness initially also end up wrestling with symptoms, including fatigue, that linger for weeks or months. For many COVID survivors, testing negative is only half the battle won. COVID-19, as an infectious viral disease induces a heavy burden on the body and can leave patients suffering from symptoms long after recovery, no matter how mild or severe the infection was. Latest findings from the National Institute of Health, Britain (NIH) suggest that infection possibilities not just multiply post-COVID, but can also launch a multi-pronged attack, causing possibly a ‘rollercoaster’ of symptoms affecting all parts of the body and mind.

While doctors suggest that full recovery would require a month or two post-infection, SARS-COV-2 can also leave lasting consequences for the body’s vital organs, and require acute health monitoring for a long time. From heart trouble, thrombosis to nervous disorders, there are some COVID signs which could indicate signs of long term trouble. Take a look:

Heart damage

People who have made successful recoveries from COVID are returning to hospitals complaining of discomfort, fullness and cardiac complications, despite having no pre-existing history for heart problems. Some have also been asked to go for preventive screenings in the long run. In fact, incidents of myocardial injuries and infraction are some of the most common post-COVID issues people face and leave lasting damage in the long run.

According to doctors, the heart is one of the most vital organs impacted by COVID, and the implications can be harsh for everyone, no matter what age, severity, immunity or condition they have. At a preliminary level, it may lead to a decrease in heart function. This could be a result of either the systemic inflammatory response to infection or direct viral infection in the heart. Excessive pressure or stress put on the lungs or the heart can also result in myocarditis, which can lead to arrhythmia or even heart failure, in rare cases. Hence, it’s important to look out for preventive signs, keep a check on essential vitals and take action accordingly. Making changes to your diet and lifestyle, as part of rehabilitative care should also be paid attention to in the long run.

Lung fibrosis

Apart from the heart, one of the ways SARS-COV-2 virus implicates your body functioning is attacking the lungs and scarring the linings across the respiratory organs, leading to a build-up of a threatening condition, commonly known as fibrosis. COVID-19 is primarily a respiratory infection and reduces vital functioning. Due to avid viral multiplication and compromised immune response, the virus can start to ‘clot’ parts of your respiratory system and make normal functions, such as breathing difficult for some. It is for the same reason, many experience bouts of breathlessness, fatigue, low oxygen saturation weeks or months after testing negative. All of these are some of the early signs of lung fibrosis and require acute care and support. Failure to take care at the earliest can have potentially faltering consequences for a person’s health, especially for someone who is over the age of 50, or is prone to respiratory disorders.

Thrombosis

Thrombosis refers to the formation of blood clots in the blood vessels, which prohibits proper blood flow through the body’s circulatory system. In some cases, a reduced, or compromised blood flow could lead to an increased risk of some patients developing blood clots in the veins that cause leg clots (deep vein thrombosis) and pulmonary embolism. Experts say COVID-19, of all diseases, carries the most risk for increased rates of thrombosis for patients who are infected by it, as well as those who have tested negative. This is far more damaging for someone who is immuno-compromised or is suffering from diabetes. It is for the same reason that patients diagnosed with COVID and those who have pre-existing medical issues are advised to take blood thinners like aspirin on a prophylactic basis to cut down on chances of complications.

Kidney damage

Studies emerging out of New York have detailed that intensive cases of COVID-19 caused long-term damage to the kidneys, with over 60% of critically ill COVID patients requiring support in the long term. Not only is this finding unexpected, but researchers also say that it is also one of the most ‘silent’ signs of degradation in the body. Problems like chronic kidney disease (CKD), renal failure are also being commonly reported amongst patients who have recovered from COVID-19.

Cognitive decline and brain fog

Brain fog, anxiety, depression, PTSD and a decreased quality of life are some of the symptoms COVID long haulers are talking about. It is just another way how a simple ‘respiratory’ virus could pose long term trouble for your brain and nervous system. Though it isn’t entirely clear as to how and why does the COVID causing virus to impact your brain functioning, effects on your mental health could have lasting problems, and further slowdown recovery. Cured patients are also reporting symptoms of memory loss, confusion, forgetfulness, likening them to dementia-like symptoms.

Mood and fatigue

People who have severe symptoms of COVID-19 often have to be treated in a hospital’s intensive care unit, with mechanical assistance such as ventilators to breathe. Simply surviving this experience can make a person more likely to later develop post-traumatic stress syndrome, depression and anxiety.

Hearing loss

COVID-19 is known to affect blood flow — which means it can impact your hearing.

Much is still unknown about how COVID-19 will affect people over time. However, researchers recommend that doctors closely monitor people who have had COVID-19 to see how their organs are functioning after recovery.

It’s important to remember that most people who have COVID-19 recover quickly. But the potentially long-lasting problems from COVID-19 make it even more important to reduce the spread of the disease by following precautions such as wearing masks, avoiding crowds and keeping hands clean.

Source: TOI, Internet

The views expressed in this article should not be considered as a substitute for a physician’s advice. Always make sure to seek a doctor or a professional’s advice before proceeding with the home treatment plan.


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WATER BORNE ILLNESS

Tips to Keep Kids Infection-Free When Swimming!

When thinking about protecting our kids or grandchildren while swimming, most of us think about using life jackets, giving them swimming lessons, and childproofing the pool, but water-borne infections should be a concern as well. So how can you keep your kids or grandchildren safe in the water and free from these germs? Read on to find out.

Infections from Germs in Pool, Lake and Water Park Water

Many of us overlook the fact that kids can get sick from the germs found in the water of pools, water parks, and lakes. Taking some simple steps can help keep children – and everyone else – safe while swimming:

Germs in the Water That Can Cause Infections

One danger when swimming is that the water can be contaminated with germs that can cause recreational water illness, such as:

• Diarrhea – This is caused by swallowing water contaminated with parasites, viruses, and bacteria, including Giardia, Salmonella, Norovirus, or even E. coli. These germs can enter the water when someone with an infection defecates in the water or the water is contaminated with raw sewage.

• Pink eye – This category of viruses, known as adenoviruses, can cause pink eye, colds, sore throats, croup, and diarrhea..

• Molluscum contagiosum – This is a rash that is similar to a wart. Although it may not be spread in swimming pool water, it can be spread by sharing towels and toys with a child who has molluscum.

• Hepatitis A – This is a viral infection that affects the liver, causing jaundice, fatigue, abdominal pain, fever, and nausea. Although often associated with contaminated food, it’s also possible to contract it from contaminated water.

• Naegleria – A rare, albeit very serious and often fatal infection that is caused by the Naegleria fowleri ameba, which is sometimes found in warm freshwater lakes and ponds.

Chlorine and Water Germs

While chlorine does kill a lot of germs in water, it can take up to an hour for the chlorine in a properly-maintained pool to work. This means that if a child has diarrhea and gets into the pool, and another child gets in straight after them, that child runs the risk of getting ill because the chlorine has not had the chance to kill any germs from the sick child.

Preventing Recreational Water Illnesses

In addition to teaching a child not to swallow water when swimming, you can help keep your child and everyone else healthy in the water if you:

• Keep your child or grandchild out of the water if they have pink eye, diarrhea, hepatitis A, or other contagious diseases.

• Don’t let children who have open wounds into the water because it could lead to an infection.

• Don’t share towels.

• Encourage everyone to take a shower before going swimming.

• Take younger children to the bathroom frequently so that they are less likely to have an accident in the water.

• Don’t change diapers by the pool – take the child to the bathroom, wash their bottom, and then wash your hands.

• Cover any molluscum lesions with a watertight bandage.

Incidence of Waterborne Diseases

It’s difficult to say how common these waterborne diseases are, as not all infections that kids catch from swimming in contaminated water are reported. However, it is estimated that around 2,000 people a year in the US are infected with waterborne diseases. Most infections occur in community swimming pools, spas and wading pools at hotels. Most experts believe that waterborne diseases are on the increase.

Water Safety Tips

Of course, keeping children safe in and around the water is equally as important. As with most child safety measures, that usually begins with proper supervision, which is one of the best ways to keep children safe in the water. That means watching your kids or grandchildren when they are in or around water, even if they know how to swim.

Other important water tips include:

• Childproofing your swimming pool so that it’s enclosed by a permanent fence that has a self-closing and self-latching gate that is tricky for younger people to open.

• Have everyone wear life jackets when on boats, jet skis or other types of watercraft.

• Only let children dive in areas that are clearly marked for diving, or when you definitely know how deep the water is.

• Learn CPR.

• Apply sunscreen to children at least 15-30 minutes before going out in the sun to avoid sunburn, and then reapply it at least every two hours, especially if your child has been in the water.

• Make sure you have a phone nearby, so that you can call for help quickly if you need it.

Source: Internet, & Others

The views expressed in this article should not be considered as a substitute for a physician’s advice. Always make sure to seek a doctor or a professional’s advice before proceeding with the home treatment plan.


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Have you tried QUINOA Milk – The Superfood?

Quinoa (pronounced KEEN-wah) may be the most widely recognizable of the so-called "ancient grains." It has been a staple in the diet of people in the Andes for thousands of years; the Incas called it “the mother of all grains.” Now touted as a modern-day “superfood,” quinoa has gained a worldwide reputation as a healthier substitute for white rice and pasta and a rare plant source of complete protein for vegetarians and vegans. Quinoa has entered our lives more and more in recent years, and it seems that today there is no home that has not heard about this special food and its many health benefits. In addition, thanks to its delicate and unique taste, quinoa can be added to a variety of dishes, salads and even various healthy energy drinks.

While we’re used to seeing it as a part of various dishes, not many know that it is possible to make healthy, nutritious milk from quinoa that will provide your body with a variety of nutrients, and will help you in ways that regular or plant-based milk can’t. In order to learn more about quinoa, its advantages and how to turn it into delicious and nutritious milk, continue reading the article below.

How to Cook Quinoa

You should rinse quinoa before cooking it to remove the outer coating, called saponin, which can leave a bitter and soapy taste. Some brands do this before packaging their quinoa, but it’s a good idea to do it again at home just to make sure you’ve washed it all away. You’ll need a fine mesh sieve so you don’t lose the tiny seeds down the drain.

To prepare quinoa, cover it with seasoned water, stock, or vegetable broth, bring it to a boil, then put a tight-fitting lid on the pot, and turn the heat down to low. Simmer it until it softens, about 15 minutes; look for the tiny spirals of the germ to appear, a sign that it’s done. Drain it with a fine mesh sieve, return it to the warm pot to rest for about 10 minutes, and then fluff it with a fork to separate the grains. Or use your rice cooker, with a 1:2 ratio of quinoa to water.

Use quinoa in just about any recipe calling for rice or another whole grain, such as rice salads, couscous recipes, or pilafs. If you keep some cooked quinoa on hand in either the fridge or freezer, you are always ready to toss it into any dish for added texture, body, and nutrition.

Storage

Similar to other dry grains, quinoa should be stored in an airtight container in a cool, dark place to prevent moisture and insects from getting into it. Once it is cooked, it will stay fresh in the refrigerator for five to seven days. You can also batch cook it and store it in the freezer in serving-size portions.

Store quinoa flour in the freezer to slow oxidation and extend its shelf life. Quinoa flakes last in the refrigerator for up to a year.

The Benefits of Quinoa:

Quinoa is considered a superfood thanks to the essential nutrients it contains which nourish the body and contribute to its overall health. The unique grain has a number of characteristics that make it a real health bomb, and the milk produced from it will provide your body with a concentrated dose in one gulp!

1. Gluten free

After years of gastrointestinal problems, many are discovering that they are sensitive to gluten, which requires them to maintain a unique diet without the component that harms them. Quinoa is naturally gluten-free, as opposed to other foods that do not contain it because of the chemical processes they undergo to make them so. This means that people who are sensitive to gluten can enjoy quinoa without fear of introducing harmful ingredient supplements, in addition to reaping the many other benefits of the unique grain.

2. Improves metabolism at the cellular level

We are used to thinking about metabolic rate at the general level, that is, in the context of processing the food we eat, producing energy from it and its effect on the body. But along with these processes, there are also internal processes at the cellular level in the digestive system, which allow it to work properly in terms of maintaining normal levels of sugar and fats in the blood. Quinoa helps to improve digestive activity at the cellular and physical levels, which contributes to overall health, prevents sedimentation of fats in the blood vessels, and helps maintain normal energy levels.

3. Strengthens muscles

Protein is an essential commodity for the body in all its forms, especially for people who exercise regularly. Besides building the muscle itself, proteins are also needed for other processes such as absorption of various minerals and other components essential for the health of the body, especially iron. In a study published in 2001, researchers found that insufficient absorption of iron leads to a poor physical condition even after consuming the required amount, so it is recommended to incorporate iron-rich foods such as quinoa in your daily diet if you wish to develop and maintain muscle mass over time.

4. Helps lower blood pressure

Quinoa is rich in dietary fibers that contribute to digestion and removal of wastes from the body, as well as lowering blood pressure. Many people who have high blood pressure do not consume enough fiber in their diet, which perpetuates the situation. Fortunately though, quinoa can help. The natural and healthy fibers of quinoa grains help lower blood pressure and thus reduce the risk of various illnesses caused by this condition, especially if it is chronic.

5. A good source of B vitamins

There are several types of vitamin B, eight to be specific, each with its own main role, such as preventing blood shortages, maintaining proper neural activity, strengthening memory, and more. Quinoa is an excellent source of vitamins from this group, and eating it or drinking milk made of it will help you maintain good overall health and improve your body’s functioning in ways you won’t even be aware of.

6. Prevents osteoporosis (bone depletion)

As time goes by, the bones in our body lose their density due to osteoporosis and other factors that sometimes lead to the development of osteoporosis. In this condition, the bones become very delicate and fragile, which can turn any fall or bump into a risk of fracture in the body. In order to prevent this condition, it is important to consume foods that are rich not only in calcium but also in magnesium, such as quinoa. This essential mineral affects the metabolism of calcium and is therefore essential for its absorption, and happily, one cup of quinoa contains about a third of its recommended daily intake. In order to optimize the absorption of magnesium in your body, it is recommended to soak the quinoa in water before cooking and then eating it normally.

7. Rich in zinc

Zinc is a mineral that is needed in the body in quite small amounts, but without it, life cannot exist. Lack of zinc interferes with insulin function, lowers sperm count in men and increases the risk of contracting infectious diseases such as colds and the flu. One cup of quinoa contains 13% of the recommended daily amount of zinc, therefore, it is considered one of the best sources of this essential mineral. In a study published in 2013, researchers found that zinc plays a vital role in maintaining the health of the skin and liver, so it is recommended to consume enough of it on a daily basis to reduce the chance of diseases that attack these and other areas.

A recipe for quinoa milk:

Now that you know a little more about quinoa and its many virtues, you can go to the pantry, take out a package of quinoa and prepare a nutritious milk with this simple recipe:

Ingredients:

1 cup quinoa

10 cups of water

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 teaspoon cinnamon powder

1 teaspoon honey (optional)

Preparation:

1. Place the quinoa in a large plastic container, pour 6 cups of water over it, cover it with a lid and put it in the refrigerator overnight for about 8 hours (this step should not be skipped because quinoa has a phytic acid that inhibits mineral absorption, and the soaking neutralizes its activity).

2. Drain the quinoa from the liquid, place it in a pot with 2 cups of water and simmer over medium heat until it softens.

3. Place the cooked quinoa in a food processor along with the remaining 2 cups of water and blend until you get a smooth drink.

4. Add vanilla extract and cinnamon to the resulting drink, mix and set aside for a few minutes.

5. Strain the quinoa milk with a cheesecloth or a fine sieve and, if necessary, add more water. Keep the milk in a storage container in the refrigerator and drink hot/cold. You can sweeten the quinoa with honey and drink it whenever you like.

Source: Internet, & Others

The views expressed in this article should not be considered as a substitute for a physician’s advice. Always make sure to seek a doctor or a professional’s advice before proceeding with the home treatment plan.


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News Report: MILLENNIALS AND DEPRESSION 2020

  • A Blue Cross Blue Shield report from 2019 found that millennials are seeing their physical and mental health decline at a faster rate than Gen X as they age. Without proper management or treatment, millennials could see a 40% uptick in mortality compared with Gen Xers of the same age, the report found.
  • Depression is on the rise among millennials. According to a report analyzing data from the Blue Cross Blue Shield Health Index, major depression diagnoses are rising at a faster rate for millennials and teens compared with any other age group.
  • More millennials are also dying "deaths of despair," or deaths related to drugs, alcohol, and suicide, Jamie Ducharme reported for Time in June, citing a report by the public-health groups Trust for America’s Health and Well Being Trust.
  • Suicide attempts have especially increased among Black youths. Suicide attempt rates for Black youths increased by 73% from 1991 to 2017, wrote clinical psychologist Inger E. Burnett-Zeiggler in an opinion piece for The New York Times, citing a November 2019 Pediatrics study. According to the study, suicide attempts decreased by 7.5% in the same time frame among white adolescents. But there are other structural factors at play behind the uptick in "deaths of despair," according to the Trust for America’s Health and Well Being Trust — namely the myriad financial problems millennials are facing: student-loan debt, healthcare, childcare, and an expensive housing market.
  • While millennials are more likely than previous generations to attend therapy, one in five diagnosed with major depression doesn’t seek treatment, according to the Blue Cross report. That might be because of rising healthcare costs.
  • Millennials don’t always have someone to share their mental burdens with — they’re less likely to have social support than other generations, as they’re marrying later and less connected to political or religious communities, according to Ducharme.
  • Cases of burnout have been increasing at an alarming rate in recent years, Ivan De Luce previously reported for Business Insider. The World Health Organization recently classified burnout as a "syndrome," medically legitimizing the condition for the first time.
  • Over half of the workers polled in a new survey from the human-resources company Paychex said their jobs were negatively affecting their mental health. What’s worse, about 56% of the employees in the survey rated their company’s mental-health benefits as either "fair" or "poor."
  • Millennials working outside a full-time corporate office are particularly vulnerable to depression, according to a University of Exeter review of 28,438 worker reports on mental health. The review found people working irregular hours and the night shift were 33% more likely to develop a mental illness than the general population.
  • In a separate study, Kantar, a UK-based data firm, found just over half of workers worldwide don’t think their workplace does enough to respond to mental-health concerns. Kantar surveyed 18,000 workers in 14 countries.
  • Nearly half of millennials have left a job for mental-health reasons. That’s according to a study conducted by Mind Share Partners, SAP, and Qualtrics and published in the Harvard Business Review. The study, which looked at mental-health challenges and stigmas in the US workplace, polled 1,500 respondents ages 16 and older working full time.

Takeaway: If you or someone you know is struggling with depression or has had thoughts of harming themselves or taking their own life, get help. The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (1-800-273-8255) provides 24/7 free, confidential support for people in distress, as well as the best practices for professionals and resources to aid in prevention and crisis situations.

You can also call the SAMHSA National Helpline, 1-800-662-HELP (4357), or reach out to the Crisis Text Line by texting HOME to 741741.

Source: Internet, Business Insider and Others


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KNOW ABOUT COUGHS

A cough can be described as a rapid expulsion of air from the lungs to clear the throat and airways of mucus, foreign particles, fluids, microbes, and various irritants. Any cough that lasts for more than eight weeks can be regarded as chronic and it is therefore advised that you seek medical help. Yet despite the advice, many people let a persistent cough go untreated for too long. Here are seven signs that indicate your cough is symptomatic of something more serious.

Here are the common triggers.

  • Viruses. Colds and the flu are the most common causes. While annoying, coughs that are “productive” get germy mucus out of your lungs when you’re sick. Most will go away in a few days. After a cold, though, some "dry" coughs last weeks or months. That could be because coughing irritates your lungs, which leads to more coughing, which irritates your lungs, and so on.
  • Allergies and asthma . If you have them, inhaling a trigger like mold can cause your lungs to overreact. They’re trying to cough out what’s bothering them.
  • Irritants. Even if you’re not allergic, things like cold air, cigarette smoke, or strong perfumes, can set off a hacking spell.
  • Postnasal drip . When you’re congested, mucus drips down from your nose into your throat, and makes you cough. You can get postnasal drip from colds, flu, sinus infections, allergies, and other problems.
  • Acid reflux . When you have heartburn, stomach acids back up into your throat, especially at night. They can irritate your windpipe, vocal chords, and throat and make you cough.
  • Other causes. Many other problems — lung inflammation, sleep apnea, and drug side effects — can be triggers. Get coughs that won’t go away checked out to make sure you don’t have a separate problem.

Structural damage from coughing

A cough can affect your health in unexpected ways. It may indicate illnesses like tuberculosis (TB) and some cancers. In addition, a chronic cough can also cause social embarrassment, interfere with sleep patterns, and cause headaches and urinary incontinence. But it doesn’t just stop there! Violent, persistent coughing can actually cause ‘structural’ damage to your body. Let’s take a look at 7 such situations:

1. Muscular pain

Persistent coughing can lead to chronic muscular pain. So every time you have a coffee fit, strong pressure is generated which can strain muscles, causing pain.

2. Cracked ribs

Rib fractures which are caused by chronic coughing generally occur in women. The middle ribs along the side are mostly affected. One of the risk factors is lower bone density. But a cough-induced rib fracture is possible and can happen in people with normal bone density.

3. Damage to small blood vessels

A violent coughing fit may cause fine blood vessels, such as in the anus and nose, to burst, which can lead to a hemorrhage.

4. Rupture of the diaphragm

During the expiratory phase of a cough, the diaphragm contracts. During forced respiratory movements, the diaphragm is pushed upward while the ribs are pushed inward and downward. Consequently, this opposing action can at times result in diaphragmatic rupture.

5. Abdominal hernia

While damage to the abdominal wall after coughing is rare, it may require surgical intervention. Abdominal herniation and abdominal muscle tears have been reported. However, abdominal muscle tears are difficult to detect and mostly occur in patients who suffer from chronic bronchitis. Yet, abdominal hernias which are generally caused by a cough are easier to detect.

6. Tissue damage in the throat

Persistent coughing can cause throat infections. This can lead to an infection risk to other parts of the body. Inflammation in the tissues of the throat may also be caused by a chronic cough.

7. Coughing up blood

Known as hemoptysis, coughing up small amounts of bright red blood or frothy blood-streaked saliva and phlegm indicates that blood from your lungs is due to a prolonged coughing or a chest infection.

Home Remedy

  • You can drink warm fluids, inhale warm, moist air, and use cough drops. Add a spoonful of honey to hot tea, or choose a cough drop that has it. Never give honey to a child under a year old — it can make them very sick.

Source: CDC, Internet, & Others

The views expressed in this article should not be considered as a substitute for a physician’s advice. Always make sure to seek a doctor or a professional’s advice before proceeding with the home treatment plan.


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LATEST NEWS: BEWARE OF COVID

Nine in ten coronavirus patients reported experiencing side-effects such as fatigue, psychological after-effects and loss of smell and taste after they recovered from the disease, according to a preliminary study by South Korea. Fatigue was the most common side-effect with 26.2% reading, followed by difficulty in concentration which had 24.6%.


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Can you guess the riskiest thing you can do to get Covid?

The answer is …Going to a bar.

See other tips from CDC to mitigate the chances of catching a Covid infection

1. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) stress the importance of hand hygiene to prevent the spread of COVID-19, which includes washing your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.

2. CDC advises people not shake out their dirty clothes when doing laundry, as it could release virus particles into the air

3. Do not touch your phone unless you have used hand sanitizer first.

4. The CDC warns people not to share items that are "difficult to clean, sanitize, or disinfect."

5. CDC says to "stop handshaking," and instead advises people to engage in non-contact methods of greeting.

6. Hug if needed with a mask. The worst thing you can do while giving a hug, however, is breathing in the other person’s face.

7. Wash your hands before you put on contacts. CDC warns that not washing your hands before is even more dangerous now because research has found that the coronavirus can enter your body through the eyes.

8. If you’re wearing the same pair while running multiple errands, you could just be spreading the coronavirus around.

9. Use your credit card instead of cash.

10. Limiting the amount of people in the car and keeping the windows down can reduce risk, but if you "increase the number of people and shut the windows, the risk goes up."

11. If entering elevator, wash your hands after getting off an elevator, especially if you touched a button or railing.

12. public pools can be dangerous because they tend to be crowded (especially with younger children), making it hard to keep a distance and not touch things that others already have.

13. Wear a mask in public. You’re wearing a mask to protect others.

14. CDC lists people with underlying medical problems as high risk for infection and severe COVID illness. If you are sick, stay indoors

15. The CDC says you should wash your face mask after every use.

16. Public transportation via a bus isn’t really all that safe, especially if the windows are closed

17. Air travel requires "spending time in security lines and airport terminals," the CDC says, which can put you in close contact with other people and possibly contaminated surfaces.

18. Avoid Theater. Movies typically run around two hours, and that’s a long time to be in an indoor space with other people.

19. gyms are particularly risky because "you’re breathing heavy and more likely to spread the virus, which aerosolizes into the air regardless of limited capacity."

20. The CDC highly recommends any gatherings take place outdoors, if possible. If not, the agency advises "[making] sure the room or space is well-ventilated."

21. one study from Japan found that people were 19 times more likely to contract the coronavirus indoors (like malls, restaurant, wedding) than they were outdoors.

22. going to a bar is possibly the riskiest thing you can do during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Source: CDC, Internet, & Others

The views expressed in this article should not be considered as a substitute for a physician’s advice. Always make sure to seek a doctor or a professional’s advice before proceeding with the home treatment plan.


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MIRACLE OF TEA TREE OIL

What Is Tea Tree Oil?

Tea tree oil is an essential oil derived from the leaves of the Melaleuca alternifolia plant, also known as Narrow-leaved paperbark. This small tree should not be confused with the tea plant, Camellia Sinensis, used to produce tea. Narrow-leaved paperbarks are native to Queensland and New South Wales, Australia, where they have been used as traditional medicine for centuries. Native Australians used the crushed leaves of this plant in inhalations to treat respiratory infections. Medical research has found that tea tree oil contains a compound called terpinene-4-ol that has been shown to kill certain harmful microorganisms.

If you already have some coconut oil, olive oil or jojoba oil in your arsenal, you might think that you don’t need any additional oil. These oils are what is called a carrier or base oil, and while they have wonderful benefits of their own and are typically also moisturizing, they can be enhanced with the use of essential oils, such as tea tree oil.

Tea tree oil combined with any base oil will make an excellent mixture, as you only need a few drops of tea tree oil and would have to dilute it anyway, since it’s too strong and can cause dermatitis when used undiluted.

Finally, never take tea tree oil orally and keep away from children, as it is toxic if ingested.

1. Treats Fungal Nail Infections and Athlete’s Foot

The antifungal properties of tea tree oil are well-studied. It was shown to at least partially or fully treat nail fungus in 6 months in 60% of the participants in one study, and another study showed that 72% of participants with athlete’s foot benefited from applying tea tree oil.

The oil can help relieve the pain and inflammation associated with these conditions and may be effective in getting rid of the fungus altogether.

How to use: mix equal parts base oil (such as olive, coconut, jojoba, sweet almond oil, etc.) and tea tree oil and apply on the affected area. No need to rinse, just make sure to wash your hands immediately to avoid spreading the fungus.

2. Relieves Psoriasis and Skin Inflammation

People with inflamed sensitive skin, dermatitis, skin allergies, bug bites or psoriasis flare-ups may benefit from tea tree oil as well.

The oil can help relieve the symptoms of these skin conditions, such as redness, flaking skin, and itching, with one study showing a 40% improvement in symptoms after application in dermatitis, significantly more than standard topical medications. Tea tree oil is also effective at treating another common type of skin inflammation, acne, both on the face and the body.

How to use: mix 2 tablespoons of a base oil of your choice with 10 drops of tea tree oil and apply this mixture to the inflamed area 2-3 times a day until you see an improvement in symptoms.

3. Promotes Wound Healing

Tea tree oil will help keep wounds clean and reduce inflammation in the affected area. Avoid applying it directly onto the wound, however, as it can be dangerous. Instead, simply apply a few drops of tea tree oil on a clean wound dressing before covering the wound with it.

If the wound is a minor cut or a scrape, you can use just a little smidgen of the mix of 1 tsp carrier oil (e.g. sweet almond oil or coconut oil) and 1 drop tea tree oil directly on a CLEAN scrape and then cover with a band-aid.

4. Can Be Used as a Hand Sanitizer

The vast majority of hand sanitizers available in stores do more harm than good, drying out your skin in the long term and making you more susceptible to disease. Since tea tree oil has valuable antimicrobial properties, you can use it to make your own DIY hand sanitizer.

How to use: mix 4 drops of tea tree oil with 2 tablespoons pure aloe vera gel and apply when needed.

You can also use tea tree oil to make a sanitizer and air freshener in one for your home. To do so, simply combine ¾ cups water with ½ cups of vinegar and 20 drops of tea tree oil in a spray bottle. You can use this mix to clean your home, just don’t forget to shake before every use.

5. Mosquito Repellent

Tea tree oil naturally possesses quite a strong scent and one that most insects choose to stay away from. In a study with cows sprayed with tea tree oil, the researchers found that the cows that were sprayed had 61% fewer insects bothering them than the ones that weren’t sprayed.

How to use: In a spray bottle, combine 20 drops tea tree oil with 20 drops lavender oil, as well as 1 tablespoon alcohol and 1 cup water. Apply this mixture before going out, focusing on the areas that aren’t covered with clothing. Shake the bottle before every use.

6. Treat Dandruff and an Itchy Scalp

Tea tree oil is beneficial for an itchy or flaky scalp. In one study with individuals suffering from dandruff, 40% of the individuals exhibited a marked improvement, but the majority of them reported a reduction of symptoms, such as itchiness, dryness, and redness.

To use tea tree to treat dandruff, you can simply add a few drops of the oil into your regular shampoo, or try making an oil-based hair mask which can be accessed via this link.

7. Hand Sanitizer

Tea tree oil makes an ideal natural hand sanitizer.

Studies have shown that it kills several common bacteria and viruses responsible for causing illness, including E. coli, S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae. Moreover, a study testing several types of hand wash shows that adding tea tree oil to the cleansers boosted their effectiveness against E. coli.

8. Natural Deodorant

Tea tree oil’s antibacterial effects may help control underarm odor related to perspiration.

Sweat itself does not smell. However, when secretions from your sweat glands combine with bacteria on your skin, a moderate to strong odor is produced.

Your underarm area contains a large concentration of these glands and is mainly responsible for what is commonly referred to as “body odor.” Tea tree oil’s bacteria-fighting properties make it an ideal natural alternative to commercial deodorants and antiperspirants.

Source: Internet, & Others

The views expressed in this article should not be considered as a substitute for a physician’s advice. Always make sure to seek a doctor or a professional’s advice before proceeding with the home treatment plan.


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Latest NEWS: COVID-19 and Children

Per the American Academy of Pediatrics, more than 500,000 children in the United States have been diagnosed with COVID-19, and the rate of new cases among kids continues to rise. The largest increases were reported in six states: Indiana, Kentucky, Missouri, Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota. As many as 103 children have died, according to the report. A disproportionate number of cases are reported in Black and Hispanic children and in places where there is high poverty.

Takeaway:

Severe outcomes and complications of the coronavirus appear to be rare among children. While children may be largely spared the worst outcomes, experts say they can spread the virus to more vulnerable family members.

The academy recommends every child over age 6 months should get the flu vaccine before the end of October.


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LATEST NEWS: FLU SHOT

Vaccinating children against the flu is “more important than ever” this year, according to the new American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommendations for preventing influenza during the 2020-21 flu season.

Today, the problem is that less than half of the country (47%) got a flu shot last year. The CDC normally recommends that 60% to 70% of the country get the influenza inoculation to keep the virus under control, and it’s pushing for 65% compliance this year. The vaccine lowers your risk of complications or dying from the flu, even if you do get sick.

Last flu season, 188 children and teens under 19 died of complications from influenza, according to the CDC. About 80% of children who die are not vaccinated.

Takeaway: get the Flu vaccine for your kids, this year.


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ARE THEY HEALTH MYTHS OR TRUTH?

1. An apple a day keeps the doctor away

Eating an apple a day can keep the doctor away. According to researchers from Cornell’s Food Science and Toxicology Department found that one fresh apple contains the antioxidant properties equal to 1500 milligrams of vitamin C. To keep your immune system functioning, your body needs vitamin C. However, German researchers in 2009, found that vitamin C can’t prevent you from catching something like a cold virus, or make it any less severe. Still, sufficient levels can reduce the duration of the illness in healthy persons.

2. Bundle up or you’ll catch a cold

As such, a virus is what causes a cold, not the cold weather itself. However, there is some truth to this partial health myth. According to a 2016 study at the Children’s Hospital in Boston, “most strains of rhinovirus (the common cold virus) replicate better at cool temperatures.” This means that while you won’t catch a cold from the cold, the virus is more likely to stick in lower temperatures.

3. Fresh fruits and vegetables are healthier than frozen produce

A study conducted in 2015 at the University of California, looked at eight different veggies and fruits. While the results varied, researchers found that fresh peas had more vitamin B than frozen ones. Meanwhile, a 2010 study from the Department of Public health in Parma, Italy, discovered that when fresh, vegetables such as cabbage, kale, Brussels sprouts, and cauliflower maintained more antioxidants and phytochemicals.

4. Chicken soup can cure your cold

Chicken soup has long been deemed as a universal remedy for all that ails you. And, there is scientific evidence that this dish does make a difference. In fact, according to the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, chicken soup provides our bodies with protein, vitamins, and antioxidants that boost our immune system.

5. Milk does the body good

Growing up you heard that milk gives us strong bones. But, according to a 2014 study published in the British Medical Journal, there was no link between milk consumption and bone fracture risk. With this in mind, a 2011 study from McMaster University found milk to be more hydrating than water for children. This, researchers concluded that milk is better than sports drinks and water because it is a source of high-quality protein, carbs, calcium, and electrolytes. But be careful – choose organic dairy and only if your child is not allergic to dairy.

6. Cholesterol is bad for you

While some cholesterol is bad for you, there are two types, LDL, which is bad, and HDL which is good. According to the American Heart Association, “Too much of the bad kind, or not enough of the good kind, increases the risk that cholesterol will slowly build up in the inner walls of the arteries that feed the heart and brain.” High cholesterol is linked to a heart attack and stroke because of this build-up in your arteries, which narrows them, making them less flexible, and preventing proper blood flow.

7. Garlic can relieve a toothache

You’ve likely heard that garlic cures toothaches, and this has turned out to be true. When you crush garlic cloves, they release allicin. This is a natural antibacterial agent, and it can help you with your tooth pain. Of course, if your tooth pain persists, be sure to get it checked by your dentist.

8. Eating before bed will give you nightmares

Eating too late, be it sugar or something else, will impact your ability to stay asleep. Eating a large meal, especially a high-carbohydrate meal, could trigger night sweats because the body generates heat as it metabolizes the food. Also, gastroesophageal reflux (GERD), caused by lying down with a full stomach, may trigger symptoms that wake you up.

9. You should always eat your crusts

Crusts are a nutritious part of the bread. In fact, according to a German study conducted in 2002, it was found that bread crust has powerful antioxidants, containing as much as eight times more antioxidants than the bread itself.

10. Eating too many carrots will turn your skin orange

While hard to believe, this is actually true. You’d have to eat a lot of carrots for it to happen though. According to the University of California, Santa Barbara, carrots are rich in beta-carotene and consuming too much can cause excess beta-carotene to enter the bloodstream where it is not properly broken down. So instead, it is deposited in the skin, which leads to an orange skin discoloration called carotenemia. This is a common and harmless condition that affects infants when they begin to eat solid foods. However, your body will eventually break down the excess beta-carotene, and your skin will return to its normal color.

Source: Internet, & Others

The views expressed in this article should not be considered as a substitute for a physician’s advice. Always make sure to seek a doctor or a professional’s advice before proceeding with the home treatment plan.


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NATURAL REMEDY: FOOT SOAK

Here is a great foot soak you can make at home that will give your feet the perfect boost.

Many people swear by this remedy, yet it uses only two common ingredients we all have in our home. Here’s how you can whip up a fantastic mixture that will have your feet looking and feeling great this summer!

What you will need

• 2-4 Cups of Milk

• A liberal sprinkling of Baking Soda

• A large bowl, big enough to fit both your feet in at the same time.

How To Create Your Foot Soak

1. Warm your milk up. You can use between two to four cups, depending on how big your bowl is, how big your feet are and how much milk you have available.

2. Pour the milk into a good-sized bowl. You need to be able to fit both feet in the container at the same time, side-by-side.

3. Soak your toes in the milk for around five minutes, and then grab your baking soda. Lightly sprinkle a liberal amount of the powder into your foot bath.

4. Mix the baking soda into the mixture by gently moving it around the bowl with your feet.

5. Make sure you give plenty of attention to areas where the skin is usually harder or thicker. These include the bottom of your heels, the area underneath your toes, and the balls of your feet. Massage plenty of the mixture into these areas. Use your hands if you need to do so.

6. Don’t forget to work the mixture into the tops of your feet and ankles as well, even if they are not fully submerged. These are the parts of your feet that are most on display when you are wearing sandals or flip flops!

7. When you have scrubbed enough, sit back with a book or your favorite TV program and let your feet soak for another five minutes.

8. Clean your feet with warm water and dry thoroughly.

You should find that your feet look and feel healthy and rejuvenated! The combination works because the two ingredients complement each other. Milk contains lactic acid which softens the skin. Baking soda, meanwhile, has abrasive properties which can remove dry and rough patches once they have been softened up.


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NATURAL REMEDIES FOR SINUS PAIN

Many of us will suffer from sinus pain. Luckily, there are a number of steps we can take around our own homes to ease the likelihood of sinus problems developing, whether the issues are caused by a common cold, allergies (such as hay fever or dust aversion) or a sinus infection (otherwise known as Sinusitis).

What Are Your Sinuses?

Sinuses are air pockets located within the bones that surround your nose. They are connected to your nasal passage by a series of small tubes and channels. Although their purpose and use are actually unclear, there are theories that suggest they play a role in controlling the amount of moisture in the air we breathe. Another school of thought proposes that they help to project our voices.

If the nose is swollen and inflamed, it can obstruct the passages to the sinuses, which can, in turn, lead to a painful blockage. The sinuses also produce mucus, which can be affected by a blockage leading to congestion or nasal drip and sometimes even a tooth or an earache. If an infection develops, it can last for weeks or even months; far beyond the duration of the problem that originally caused the infection to develop (i.e. a cold or allergy).

So What Should You Do To Combat Sinus Pain?

There are a number of proven steps we can take to ease sinus pain, and most of them are cheap and easy for anyone to try…

1. Drink Plenty of Fluids

Staying hydrated is an important health concern for many reasons, but it also helps keep your sinuses moist. You should drink plenty of water but avoid caffeine and alcohol, which can encourage dehydration. Fluid intake requirements differ from individual to individual and also depend on the present weather conditions, but as a general rule, you should aim to drink around 68 fluid ounces (or approximately two liters) of water every day.

2. Take a Steamy Shower or Bath

Hot water vapor is an effective way of moistening your sinuses and helping to keep them clear. A hot bath or shower can help remove mucus and debris stuck inside your nose and keep the passageways that serve the sinuses free of obstruction. For a further boost, try dropping some Eucalyptus Oil in the bath with you – it’s a great, natural decongestant.

3. Eat Spicy Foods

Spicy foods are not for everyone but they can help clear your nasal passages. If you are a fan of fiery foods such as curry, hot peppers, and mustard, drop some extra into your evening meal to help open up your nasal passage.

4. Get a Humidifier

A humidifier helps to keep the air moist, providing you with a great way of eliminating arid air that is a leading cause of dry sinuses. You should only use a humidifier during dry summer months wherever you live and keep your eye on it – the humidity levels should ideally sit at around 30-50%. If condensation starts to form on your windows, you need to adjust the settings or turn it off! Any humidifier should be kept clean as mold can form on them – and that can cause allergies in itself.

5. Use a Warm Compress

Warm compresses can help with sinus pain as they help keep the nasal passage moist. Put uncooked rice or oats inside a clean tube sock, and add some lavender or cinnamon for a more pleasant fragrance. Microwave the compress for 30 seconds then test it. If you are happy with the level of warmth, remove it and apply it on to the nose and surrounding areas. Alternatively, fill a large bowl with steaming hot water, place a towel over your head to stop the air from escaping and lean over the bowl to breathe in the air. Again, adding some eucalyptus oil to the water can be beneficial.

6. Use a Saline Solution

A saline solution can be as effective as a decongestant in combating blocked passage ways that can lead to sinus pain. A saline wash thins mucus so that it can flow more effectively through the nose and surrounding chambers. Studies have concluded that saline solutions are some of the best lines of defense against sinusitis and can be used daily to prevent symptoms from developing.

7. Guard Your home Against Allergies

Allergy flare-ups are a common cause of sinus pain and we can take steps to avoid them. As allergies often flare in the evening, ensure your bedroom is kept free of factors that can contribute to irritation. Dust covers on your pillows and quilts can help eliminate pesky dust allergies and although it may leave you heavy of heart, stopping your pets from sleeping in your bedroom can help as well. If there are flowering plants in your room, you may also consider removing them if you are experiencing pain or irritation.

8. Try Bromelain Supplements

Bromelain is a protein found in pineapple stems and can be bought as a supplement from health food and natural remedy stores. It has been used by boxers and other combat sportsmen to reduce inflammation after fights and there is evidence of success when it is used to reduce swelling around the nose associated with sinus problems. You should, however, consult your doctor before taking Bromelain if you are on any other medication, as it may interact with them. Be sure to read the dosage instructions carefully.

9. Avoid Antibiotics Until You Have Exhausted Natural Remedies

Most sinus problems are viral, not bacterial. So antibiotics should not be used in the majority of cases. Antibiotics are our best defense against bacteria but they are not effective against viruses and are not an appropriate treatment for them. Overuse of antibiotics can actually lead to bacterial resistance and make you more susceptible to superbugs. Natural remedies and over-the-counter medication should be your first port-of-call and if problems persists.

10. See Your Doctor When Problems Persist

If the natural and over-the-counter remedies fail to improve your condition, you should consult a Doctor. Doctors can make a referral for a scan which may uncover anatomical blockages that require surgery, or they can send you to be allergy tested. Your Doctor can also refer you to an Ear, Nose and Throat Specialist if your problems require a more involved or integrated form of treatment than natural remedies can provide.

How To Make a Saline Solution at Home

You can buy saline solution from your local pharmacy, but if you want to make your own you can do so. Mix half a teaspoon (2.5g) of salt and half a teaspoon (2.5g) of baking soda in 1 cup of water at room temperature. Use clean bottled water if possible. If you use tap water, sterilize it and let it cool until it is lukewarm.

To apply the saline solution, whether it be homemade or purchased:

  • Use an all-rubber ear syringe which you can buy at a pharmacy.
  • User a water flosser, set on low.
  • Pour the solution into your hand, and sniff it up each nostril separately.

Aim the solution towards the back of your head, not the top, and it should run through your nasal passageways and into the back of your throat. Once it arrives in your mouth, you can spit out the remains, so apply when near to a sink.

Source: Internet, & Others

The views expressed in this article should not be considered as a substitute for a physician’s advice. Always make sure to seek a doctor or a professional’s advice before proceeding with the home treatment plan.


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SHOULD I TAKE A FLU SHOT?

With the pandemic still in full swing, health officials are advising people to make a flu vaccine a top priority this year. Flu activity typically peaks between December and February, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), but flu activity can last as late as May. Experts are warning of a “twindemic,” or the overlap of flu season and COVID-19 when hospitals and medical professionals can be overwhelmed with sick people.

Although it has yet to be peer-reviewed, a June 2020 study found that people with COVID-19 who had received a recent flu vaccine were 8% less likely to need intensive care treatment than those who hadn’t received a vaccine. They were 18% less likely to need a ventilator and 17% less likely to die.

Both Flu and Covid are caused by a similar virus. One big difference is that COVID-19 symptoms may include loss of taste or smell. Because symptoms are so similar, experts say it’s important to reach out to your doctor or get tested if you are sick.

Takeaway: The CDC recommends you get vaccinated by the end of October. September and October are typically the best months for full seasonal coverage. The CDC recommends that nearly everyone 6 months old and up should get a flu vaccine, with few exceptions. Because some vaccines are made using chicken eggs, people with egg allergies have often avoided the vaccine. The CDC says that people with mild or moderate egg allergies can get any flu vaccine that is otherwise appropriate for their age and health.