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OBESITY IN AMERICA – LATEST STATS

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Adult Obesity

Obesity is defined as a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or higher.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released a new map detailing adult obesity rates across the country. In 1995, when the CDC first collected this data in all states, not a single one had an obesity rate higher than 19%. In 2013, the CDC announced, every single state in the country had an obesity rate of at least 20%.

Obesity prevalence in 2013 varies across states and regions

· No state had a prevalence of obesity less than 20%.

· 7 states and the District of Columbia had a prevalence of obesity between 20% and <25%.

· 23 states had a prevalence of obesity between 25% and <30%.

· 18 states had a prevalence of obesity between 30% and <35%.

· 2 states (Mississippi and West Virginia) had a prevalence of obesity of 35% or greater.

· The South had the highest prevalence of obesity (30.2%), followed by the Midwest (30.1%), the Northeast (26.5%), and the West (24.9%).

Rates of obesity were highest in Mississippi (35.1%) and West Virginia (35.1%) and lowest in Hawaii (21.8%) and Colorado (21.3%).

Here is the new map showing that grim picture:

http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/images/2013-state-obesity-prevalence-map.png

Childhood Obesity Facts:

In children and adolescents aged 2 to 19 years, obesity was defined as a body mass index (BMI) at or above the 95th percentile of the sex-specific CDC BMI-for-age growth charts.

· Approximately 17% (or 12.7 million) of children and adolescents aged 2—19 years had obesity.

· The prevalence of obesity among children aged 2 to 5 years decreased significantly from 13.9% in 2003-2004 to 8.4% in 2011-2012.

· There are significant racial and age disparities in obesity prevalence among children and adolescents. In 2011-2012, obesity prevalence was higher among Hispanics (22.4%) and non-Hispanic black youth (20.2%) than non-Hispanic white youth (14.1%). The prevalence of obesity was lower in non-Hispanic Asian youth (8.6%) than in youth who were non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black or Hispanic.

· In 2011-2012, 8.4% of 2- to 5-year-olds had obesity compared with 17.7% of 6- to 11-year-olds and 20.5% of 12- to 19-year-olds.

· Overall, obesity prevalence among children whose adult head of household completed college was approximately half that of those whose adult head of household did not complete high school (9% vs 19% among girls; 11% vs 21% among boys) in 1999–2010.

· Among non-Hispanic white children, the lowest prevalence of obesity was observed among those whose adult head of household completed college; however, this was not the case for non-Hispanic black children.

· Over time, the prevalence of obesity among girls whose adult head of household had not finished high school increased from 17% (1999–2002) to 23% (2007–2010), but decreased for girls whose adult head of household completed college from 11% (1999–2002) to 7% (2007–2010). There was not a similar finding among boys.

· Obesity prevalence was the highest among children in families with an income-to-poverty ratio of 100% or less (household income that is at or below the poverty threshold), followed by those in families with an income-to-poverty ratio of 101%–130%, and then found to be lower in children in families with an income-to-poverty ratio of 131% or larger (greater household income).

· Obesity prevalence on the basis of family income among children from low-income households was:

o 14.2% among children in families with an income-to-poverty ratio of less than or equal to 50%.

o 14.5% among children in families with an income-to-poverty ratio of 51–100%.

o 13.4% among children in families with an income-to-poverty ratio of 101–130%.

o 12.4% among children in families with an income-to-poverty ratio of 131–150%.

o 11.8% among children in families with an income-to-poverty ratio of 151-185%.

Don’t brush aside Obesity. Talk to your child’s doctor about it.

Source: CDC & Business Insider

Author: txnaturalpediatrics

By training, I am a American Board Certified Pediatrician. But in my younger years I grew up with natural alternatives. As a mom I have tried to incorporate both for my kids and it has worked wonders. And finally, as I am studying natural & alternative medicines, I realize the beauty and wisdom of living closer to earth. Hence in my practice I integrate both...for acute ailments I follow American Academy of Pediatrics recommendation but for simple and/or chronic conditions I prefer natural alternatives. In western training we were raised to think that "health is the absence of symptoms and problems". But eastern sensibilities has educated me that "Health is state that allows one to use the full capabilities of their body, mind and intellect. Therefore, healthy living is a balanced state of well being: physically, mentally, socially and spiritually." This implies that healing is not a "one-pill-fits-all", but a personalized experience.

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