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YOGA FOR TRIMMING FAT

There are small variations in the way yogis do this sequence, but the most important thing is the synchronization of the motion of your breath with the movement of your body. Basically, all upward movements are coupled with inhalation, and downward movements with exhalation.

1. MOUNTAIN POSE

Start in Mountain pose: stand up tall, feet together or a little apart, arms at your sides. Place your palms together in a prayer position, roll your shoulders back and down and lift your chest.

2. INHALE

Inhale through your nose and extend your arms above and behind your head.

3. SWAN DIVE

Swan dive into a standing forward bend, exhaling through your nose and placing your hands on your legs as close to your feet as you can. Bend your knees a little if your hamstrings are tight, to protect your back.

4. HALF STANDING FORWARD BEND

Inhale and lengthen your spine forward into a Half Standing Forward Bend, with your fingertips on the floor and gaze focused ahead.

5. PLANK POSE

Exhale and step, or lightly hop, your feet behind you to get into a Plank pose, arms straight underneath your shoulders and legs straight behind you. Your back should be flat and your core engaged. Hold for a second, then, in a snake-like movement, lower yourself towards the floor. Then lower your chest and chin to the floor, keeping your elbows close to the sides of your ribcage, and flatten your feet to the floor.

6. COBRA POSE

Inhale as you push down with your arms and raise your head, shoulders and upper body as far as you can without straining. This is the Cobra pose. Look upwards, roll shoulders back and down and keep elbows in. Firm up your kneecaps and thighs to prevent them lifting off the mat.

7. DOWNWARD FACING DOG

Exhale into Downward Facing Dog; walk hands forward and slightly farther apart than shoulder width, and spread fingers wide for stability. Then curl toes under and press your hips upwards so your body is in the shape of a triangle, with your bottom as the apex. Make sure your neck and shoulders are released and relaxed. If your hamstrings are tight, keep your knees slightly bent. Take five deep breaths.

8. FORWARD BEND

Inhale, step forward one foot and then the other between the hands, looking ahead. Then exhale into a forward bend.

9. INHALE

Inhale and come up, arms above and behind head.

10. STANDING POSE

Lower arms into original standing pose.


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STRANGE FACTS ON CURRENT OBESITY LEVELS (BY WHO)

· 61% overweight in both sexes. Obesity rates are low in the Southeast Asia Region, with only 22% overweight, making it the least obese region in the world.

· Around 3.4 million adults die each year as a result of being overweight or obese, according to WHO.

· Surprisingly, in all WHO regions, women are more likely to be obese than men.

200 CALORIES – YOU BE THE JUDGE

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ALARMING CHARTS ON WHY YOU ARE PUTTING ON POUNDS – II

The Obesity Epidemic Started When The Low-Fat Guidelines Were Published

National Center for Health Statistics (US). Health, United States, 2008: With Special Feature on the Health of Young Adults. 2009 Mar. Chartbook.

Read more: http://authoritynutrition.com/12-graphs-that-show-why-people-get-fat/#ixzz3CNMnTqSX


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ALARMING CHARTS ON WHY YOU ARE PUTTING ON POUNDS

Sugar Consumption Has Skyrocketed

Johnson RJ, et al. Potential role of sugar (fructose) in the epidemic of hypertension, obesity and the metabolic syndrome, diabetes, kidney disease, and cardiovascular disease. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2007.


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OBESITY IN AMERICA – LATEST STATS

Adult Obesity

Obesity is defined as a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or higher.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released a new map detailing adult obesity rates across the country. In 1995, when the CDC first collected this data in all states, not a single one had an obesity rate higher than 19%. In 2013, the CDC announced, every single state in the country had an obesity rate of at least 20%.

Obesity prevalence in 2013 varies across states and regions

· No state had a prevalence of obesity less than 20%.

· 7 states and the District of Columbia had a prevalence of obesity between 20% and <25%.

· 23 states had a prevalence of obesity between 25% and <30%.

· 18 states had a prevalence of obesity between 30% and <35%.

· 2 states (Mississippi and West Virginia) had a prevalence of obesity of 35% or greater.

· The South had the highest prevalence of obesity (30.2%), followed by the Midwest (30.1%), the Northeast (26.5%), and the West (24.9%).

Rates of obesity were highest in Mississippi (35.1%) and West Virginia (35.1%) and lowest in Hawaii (21.8%) and Colorado (21.3%).

Here is the new map showing that grim picture:

http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/images/2013-state-obesity-prevalence-map.png

Childhood Obesity Facts:

In children and adolescents aged 2 to 19 years, obesity was defined as a body mass index (BMI) at or above the 95th percentile of the sex-specific CDC BMI-for-age growth charts.

· Approximately 17% (or 12.7 million) of children and adolescents aged 2—19 years had obesity.

· The prevalence of obesity among children aged 2 to 5 years decreased significantly from 13.9% in 2003-2004 to 8.4% in 2011-2012.

· There are significant racial and age disparities in obesity prevalence among children and adolescents. In 2011-2012, obesity prevalence was higher among Hispanics (22.4%) and non-Hispanic black youth (20.2%) than non-Hispanic white youth (14.1%). The prevalence of obesity was lower in non-Hispanic Asian youth (8.6%) than in youth who were non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black or Hispanic.

· In 2011-2012, 8.4% of 2- to 5-year-olds had obesity compared with 17.7% of 6- to 11-year-olds and 20.5% of 12- to 19-year-olds.

· Overall, obesity prevalence among children whose adult head of household completed college was approximately half that of those whose adult head of household did not complete high school (9% vs 19% among girls; 11% vs 21% among boys) in 1999–2010.

· Among non-Hispanic white children, the lowest prevalence of obesity was observed among those whose adult head of household completed college; however, this was not the case for non-Hispanic black children.

· Over time, the prevalence of obesity among girls whose adult head of household had not finished high school increased from 17% (1999–2002) to 23% (2007–2010), but decreased for girls whose adult head of household completed college from 11% (1999–2002) to 7% (2007–2010). There was not a similar finding among boys.

· Obesity prevalence was the highest among children in families with an income-to-poverty ratio of 100% or less (household income that is at or below the poverty threshold), followed by those in families with an income-to-poverty ratio of 101%–130%, and then found to be lower in children in families with an income-to-poverty ratio of 131% or larger (greater household income).

· Obesity prevalence on the basis of family income among children from low-income households was:

o 14.2% among children in families with an income-to-poverty ratio of less than or equal to 50%.

o 14.5% among children in families with an income-to-poverty ratio of 51–100%.

o 13.4% among children in families with an income-to-poverty ratio of 101–130%.

o 12.4% among children in families with an income-to-poverty ratio of 131–150%.

o 11.8% among children in families with an income-to-poverty ratio of 151-185%.

Don’t brush aside Obesity. Talk to your child’s doctor about it.

Source: CDC & Business Insider