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TEEN DRIVING – CAUSE OF ACCIDENTS

Per the AAA study, 963,000 drivers ages 16-19 were involved in police-reported motor vehicle crashes in 2013, which resulted in 383,000 injuries and 2,865 deaths.

Key Findings

The driver was found to have been driving too fast for conditions in 79% of single-vehicle crashes; following too closely in 36% of rear-end crashes, and failed to yield to another vehicle in 43% of angle crashes.

The driver was inattentive or engaged in some other non-driving-related activity in 58% of crashes overall (44% of loss-of-control crashes, 89% of road -departure crashes, 76% of rear-end crashes, and 51% of angle crashes).

The most frequent potentially-distracting behaviors were conversing or otherwise interacting with passengers and cell phone use.

Read more: https://www.aaafoundation.org/sites/default/files/2015TeenCrashCausationFS.pdf


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PRACTICAL TIPS ON TEENS AND DRIVING

October 19-25 is Teen Driver Safety Week, and it’s a great time for parents to talk to their teen drivers about the risks they face.

FACTS:

  • · Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for teens 14-18 in America.
  • · Newly licensed teens: Crash risk is particularly high during the first months of licensure.
  • · 56% of teens said they talk on the phone while driving.
  • · Only 44% of teens said they would definitely speak up if someone were driving in a way that scared them.
  • · Statistics show that 16 and 17-year-old driver death rates increase with each additional passenger.

Every parent should talk to their teens about the rules of safe driving, but a recent survey shows that only 25 percent of parents have done so.

Eight Danger Zones: Make sure your young driver is aware of the leading causes of teen crashes:

  • · Driver inexperience
  • · Driving with teen passengers
  • · Nighttime driving
  • · Not using seat belts
  • · Distracted driving
  • · Drowsy driving
  • · Reckless driving
  • · Impaired driving

WHAT DO I DO?

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has teamed up with state and local highway safety and law enforcement organizations on the teen driver safety campaign “5 to Drive.”

1. No Drinking and Driving. Compared with other age groups, teen drivers are at a greater risk of death in alcohol-related crashes.

2. Buckle Up. Every Trip. Every Time. Front Seat and Back. In 2012, of all the young (15- to 20-year-old) passenger vehicle drivers killed in crashes, more than half (55%) of those killed were not wearing seat belts.

3. Put It Down. One Text or Call Could Wreck It All. In 2012, among drivers 15 to 19 years old who were distracted in fatal crashes, nearly 1 in 5 were distracted by their phones. This age group had the highest percentage of drivers distracted by phone use. Don’t allow activities that may take your teen’s attention away from driving, such as talking on a cell phone, texting, eating, or playing with the radio.

4. Stop Speeding Before It Stops You. In 2012, speeding was a factor in almost half (48 percent) of the crashes that killed 15- to 20-year-old drivers. By comparison, 30 percent of all fatal crashes that year involved speeding.

5. No More Than One Passenger at a Time. Extra passengers for a teen driver can lead to disastrous results. Research shows that the risk of a fatal crash goes up in direct relation to the number of teens in a car. The likelihood of teen drivers engaging in risky behavior triples when traveling with multiple passengers.

6. Provide at least 30 to 50 hours of supervised driving practice over at least six months. Make sure to practice on a variety of roads, at different times of day, and in varied weather and traffic conditions. This will help your teen gain the skills he or she needs to be safe. Help your teen avoid insufficient scanning. Stress the importance of continually scanning for potential hazards including other vehicles, bicyclists, and pedestrians.

7. Make sure your teen is off the road by 9 or 10 p.m. for at least the first six months of licensed driving.

8. Be sure your teen is fully rested before he or she gets behind the wheel.

9. Make sure your teen knows to follow the speed limit and adjust speed to road conditions. Remind your teen to maintain enough space behind the vehicle ahead to avoid a crash in case of a sudden stop.

10. Be a good role model: don’t drink and drive, and reinforce this message with your teen.

11. Sign a Teen Driving agreement: http://www.cdc.gov/ParentsAreTheKey/pdf/Parent_Teen_Driving_Agreement-a.pdf

For more information about Teen Driver Safety Week and the “5 to Drive” campaign visit www.safercar.gov/parents, CDC and others

Check out: http://driveithome.org/ and http://www.dmv.org/tx-texas/teens/


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ROAD SAFETY / FATALITY REPORT

Here are the number of road fatalities in 2012 per 100,000 people in each state:

Business Insider/Andy Kiersz, data from Michael Sivak, University of Michigan

North Dakota, Montana, and Wyoming are the most dangerous states, with over 20 deaths per 100,000 people each. Meanwhile, more densely populated areas tend to be safer. New York had about 6 deaths per 100,000 people, Massachusetts about 5 per 100,000, and in Washington D.C., there were only about 2 deaths per 100,000 people.

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/university-of-michigan-car-crash-study-2014-7#ixzz37T1vELBN


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ROAD RAGE – DOES DOES YOUR CITY RANK?

HURRAY TO DALLAS. IT MOVED DOWN THE LIST OF CRAZY DRIVERS.

Least Courteous
2014 2013
Houston New York City
Atlanta Dallas
Baltimore Detroit
Washington DC Atlanta
Boston Minneapolis
Most Courteous
2014 2013
Portland Portland
Pittsburgh Cleveland
St. Louis Baltimore
San Francisco Sacramento
Charlotte Pittsburgh

Source: AutoVantage


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SAVE YOUR TEEN

SAVE YOUR TEEN BY TALKING TODAY

Can you guess the number 1 reason for death among teens? Drugs? Alcohol? Smoking? fast driving? sports?

NOPE.

It is TEXTING AND DRIVING

STUDY

Nearly 43 percent of high school students of driving age who were surveyed in 2011 reported texting while driving at least once in the past 30 days, according to a study to be presented Saturday, May 4, at the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) annual meeting

Motor vehicle accidents are the leading cause of death among teenagers, and using a phone while driving significantly increases the risk of accidents in this age group. The specific act of texting while driving has been found to raise the risk of a crash by 23 times, leading many to conclude that texting while driving is more dangerous than driving while intoxicated.

Males were more likely to text while driving than females (46 percent vs. 40 percent), and the prevalence of texting increased with age (52 percent of those over 18 years; 46 percent of 17-year-olds; 33 percent of 16-year-olds; and 26 percent of 15-year-olds).

CORRELATION

Teens who reported texting while driving were more likely to engage in other risky behaviors such as driving under the influence of alcohol, having unprotected sex and using an indoor tanning device.

Researchers also found that state laws banning texting while driving had little effect: 39 percent of teens reported texting in states where it is illegal.

MORE DATA

WHAT CAN YOU DO ABOUT IT?

Talk to you child about “texting while driving” TODAY.

Be Strict. “If you do text while driving, you will lose the prevelidge of driving.”