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How do you deal with farts and abdominal gas?

Experiencing occasional bloating and flatulence is part of normal human digestion. In fact, an average adult passes gas between 13 and 21 times a day.

Problems begin when the abdominal gas produced in the gut becomes trapped, which sometimes feels like a sharp stabbing pain in your belly or chest. This pain can sometimes be so severe that people mistake it for appendicitis or even a heart attack.

Treating the problem as fast as possible can help relieve the pain before it becomes severe. The home remedies listed in this article can effectively relieve trapped gas pain.

Symptoms and Causes of Trapped Wind

People who experience trapped gas describe it as acute discomfort in the belly. Bloating and stomach cramps can be present too. Sometimes, trapped wind bubbles can cause a sudden sharp and stabbing pain in the abdomen and chest that can be confused with other serious health conditions, such as appendicitis, gallstones, or a heart attack. Trapped gas can occur for a vast variety of reasons.

Certain foods, such as beans, cabbage, and bran can also make your gut bacteria produce more carbon dioxide gases in the intestinal tract, which can lead to bloating excess gas.

People suffering from food intolerance, chronic constipation, ulcers, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and other digestive issues are more likely to experience the inability to pass gas too. But even healthy people can experience trapped wind if they happen to eat too fast, smoke, chew a lot of gum, or have a stuffy nose, which makes them swallow a lot of air.

Therefore, knowing how to address the issue rather than focusing only on prevention is key when it comes to trapped intestinal gas, bloating, and constipation.

Home Remedies For Trapped Gas

We list several effective home remedies for expelling trapped wind below. Do keep in mind that different remedies work best for different people, so trying a few of these or combining them is probably the best strategy to find quick relief.

1. Move Your Body and Bowels

Walking around the house, doing some light housework, playing, or taking a child or a pet for a walk all help tremendously to expel the trapped gas. Activity moves and engages the abdominal and intestinal muscles, which can help you release the gas and speed up a bowel movement, which can also encourage the gas to make its way out of the digestive system.

2. Give your belly a massage

If moving around is difficult and painful, a gentle self-massage can help stimulate the digestive system and promote peristalsis – wave-like muscle contractions that move food and abdominal gas through the GI tract. Gently massage the tender spot or massage the entire abdominal cavity by moving your palm in counter-clockwise circles.

3. Apply heat to the area

The sensation of warmth can be very soothing and relaxing, which can help relax you emotionally and ease the spasm of the muscles in your gut that cause the pain. You can take a warm bath, use a heating pad, or just a hot water bottle for that purpose. Make sure not to use excessive heat and wrap the heating pad or hot water bottle in a towel or blanket to protect the skin from a burn.

4. Drink herbal tea

Drinking warm herbal tea or any noncarbonated liquid can help relieve the pain for many people. The advantage of herbal teas is that they combine the warming action with medicinal properties.

Mint, ginger, anise, or chamomile tea all calm the gut from the inside out, relieving bloating and hydrating your body to promote digestion.

5. Explore your spice drawer

Certain spices have been used as a natural kitchen remedy for trapped gas for millennia. Here are a few of such herbs as: Coriander, Caraway, Fennel, Ginger, Turmeric.

Steeping these seeds in a glass of warm water and drinking the mixture can help you expel the trapped wind and reduce abdominal discomfort and pain. Fennel seeds, in particular, are an ancient solution for trapped gas. Simply chew on 1 teaspoon of the seeds to find relief. One traditional Persian remedy suggests that you mix 1 teaspoon ground fennel and cumin seeds each with ½ teaspoon of ground anise, and soaking them in 1 cup of boiling water for 15 minutes.

6. Try the knee-to-chest yoga pose

Yoga stretches are an excellent option for helping the trapped gas be expelled from the intestines. There are several yoga poses that target this specific concern. We discuss 6 of such poses in this article – 6 Yoga Stretches to Relieve Bloating. But if you’re looking for just one simple option that you can even when you’re experiencing abdominal discomfort and pain, apanasana is probably the best choice. This yoga stretch is literally translated as “wind-relieving pose” from Sanskrit. Here’s how to do it:

1. Lie down on your back, legs and arms extended.

2. Bend the knees and place your hands on the knees.

3. Use the hands to guide your knees up and towards the chest. Your knees and chest don’t have to touch, but you should feel a gentle stretch in the back body.

4. Lift the head and neck off the ground and move towards your knees, engaging your core muscles. Breathe deeply and hold this pose for 20 seconds. Then return to the initial position. Repeat if necessary 2-3 times.
In summary, trapped wind can be extremely uncomfortable and painful. But the good news is that it’s highly treatable using home remedies and lifestyle tweaks. If the tips we mentioned didn’t help or you’re experiencing other symptoms, make sure to consult your doctor to rule out any serious health conditions and find a treatment that works for you.

Source: Internet, CDC, Medical News & Others

The views expressed in this article should not be considered as a substitute for a physician’s advice. Always make sure to seek a doctor or a professional’s advice before proceeding with the home treatment plan.


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Joint Pain

Reasons why our joints pain

Whether you overdid your workout session or just have been sitting for a long time in the same position, there are several unexplained reasons why your joints may hurt in a day. Joint pain caused by these everyday issues generally goes away on its own when you stretch yourself a little and flex your muscles.

But there are times when your joints may hurt incessantly without a cause, and pain starts getting intense. Chronic or prolonged joint pain is a symptom of some underlying health conditions that may turn more problematic in the future.

a man touching his knees
Photo by Kindel Media on Pexels.com

Apart from joint-related pain due to old age, here are some conditions that may hurt your joints.

​Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis that may lead to bone-related problems. The condition arises due to the breakdown of cartilage, which serves as a cushion between the joints. This bone-related issue is common with ageing and mostly affects the knees, hips, neck and lower back. Joint stiffness is a common characteristic of osteoarthritis. It is accompanied by other symptoms like sharp and intense aching that gets worse with movement.

​Previous injury
Having a previous injury can also increase the risk of joint problems later in life. Whether your injury is treated or untreated, in both cases you may develop bone-related issues later in life. The problem may be severe in the winter season. It happens due to the drop in barometric pressure causes the tissue and fluid around joints to expand, causing pain at the site of an old injury. If your old injury is causing a problem it is better to consult your doctor.

​Rheumatoid arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is another joint-related issue, but it is not developed due to the wear and tear of joints like osteoarthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis is rather an autoimmune disease, caused due to immune system malfunctions. The common symptoms of this condition include inflammation and stiffness in joints. One may also feel fatigued, feverish and witness unexplained weight loss when suffering from this condition. Being an autoimmune disease, Rheumatoid arthritis cannot be cured. Symptoms can only be managed with antibiotics or other prescription medicines.

​Hypothyroidism

The thyroid is a butterfly-shaped gland present in the front of your neck. It is responsible for producing several types of hormones for the body that helps to regulate the body’s metabolic rate, muscle and digestive function, brain development and bone maintenance. Any disruption in the quantity of the hormones produced by the body can lead to varied symptoms including joints pain. An underactive or overactive thyroid gland can also make you more prone to injuries and fractures.

​Depression

Depression is a mental health condition, but the symptoms may manifest even on your physical health. Unexpected aches and pain in the joints that you may experience when suffering from chronic depression could be just a sign of the mental condition. Getting treatment for depression, be it medication or counseling can help to get ease the problem of joint pain. Other signs of depression may include a change in appetite, sleep disturbances, difficulty concentrating, and feelings of hopelessness.

Joint pain in children

Common cause

  • Trauma – 30%
  • Overuse – 28%
  • Structural -18%
  • Growing pains – 8%

Growing pains are a common cause of leg pain in children. These pains are muscle aches that can occur in the thighs, behind the knees, or the calves. Other possible causes of leg pain that may be more serious can include juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), lupus, Lyme disease, and leukemia. Arthralgia is extremely common in childhood. 5-30% of children have chronic pain complaints and it is more common in girls. It may may last years.

Solution for Growing pains in kids

  • A warm bath. Bathing in warm water, especially before bedtime, can help reduce aches and pains and promote sleep.
  • Massaging. Gently massaging or rubbing the affected area can make the child feel better. Merely holding or cuddling the child may also help.
  • Stretching. Gently stretching the calves and thighs during the day may ease or prevent symptoms. However, stretching exercises may be challenging for younger children. Ask a doctor what types of exercises are best.
  • Warmth. Try applying a heating pad or hot water bottle to the affected area. Make sure these are not too hot and take care to protect the child’s skin from burning. Do not use these items during sleep.
  • Painkillers. Over-the-counter (OTC) medication, such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen, can help relieve aches and pains on an occasional basis.

People should not give aspirin to children. Doctors do not recommend aspirin for children, as they have linked it with a rare but serious condition called Reye’s syndrome.

Source: Internet, CDC, Medical News & Others

The views expressed in this article should not be considered as a substitute for a physician’s advice. Always make sure to seek a doctor or a professional’s advice before proceeding with the home treatment plan.


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Understanding Common Cold

Myths about colds you have to stop believing

people wearing diy masks
Photo by cottonbro on Pexels.com

1. Leaving the house with wet hair can cause a cold

Wet hair may make us feel cold, but it can’t cause a cold. We get sick by catching one of the 200 viruses that are in the air looking for their way into our upper respiratory tract; If our immune system isn’t strong enough to ward off the virus, we get infected. The viruses spread through tiny droplets that release when a person is sick, through sneezing, nose blowing, or touching the eyes, nose, or mouth after touching an object, such as a door handle or a keyboard that is contaminated with small bacteria.

2. Weather changes can cause a cold

the false belief that treading outside with wet hair can make us sick, even a temperature fluctuation or a transition from hot to cold weather can’t cause a cold. The only way to catch a virus is by just touching or staying close to sick people. However, there is some truth to the belief that colds occur more often in winter – this is because when the temperature drops, people tend to stay indoors in less ventilated areas, creating a density that prevents the circulation of air and facilitates the passage of viruses from one person to another.

3. Antibiotics help to overcome the common cold

It is important to know that antibiotics fight bacteria rather than viruses, so taking them unnecessarily may actually harm your health and weaken your immune system. In addition, taking unnecessary antibiotics may also cause stomach problems and fungal infections. Please note that colds don’t require antibiotics, instead, you can take natural painkillers or supplements that will relieve the symptoms and allow the body to recover on its own.

Strategies for preventing colds

1. Washing hands

The simplest and most well-known strategy for preventing colds and other illnesses is washing your hands with soap and water. This easy action can protect your children and prevent disease. One of the reasons why children get sick is contact with dirty eyes or hands full of viruses. To reinforce this claim, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania found that children in the study group who didn’t keep their hands clean were absent from school twice as often as children who were consistent hand washers. Therefore, it is important to make it clear to your children that all they have to do is wash their hands with soap and water for half a minute, and this can prevent them from catching a cold in the coming winter.

2. Cover your nose when sneezing and your mouth when coughing

Another strategy that should be obvious to every parent is covering the mouth and nose when coughing and sneezing. With every sneeze and coughing millions of bacteria are released into the open air at a very high speed, they may pass on to others and cause them to catch a cold; However, the bacteria that spread in the air are dangerous only if the sneezing/coughing is done in the face of another person, even though the bacteria can reach surfaces which people and children come in contact. Either way, this obvious and polite strategy can prevent your children from getting a cold this winter or infecting others if you only know how to sneeze and cough into your elbow or a handkerchief.

3. Disinfecting surfaces

In order to prevent your children from catching a cold this winter, you can use the simple but slightly pedantic strategy of disinfecting surfaces. Various bacteria that can cause colds can live on different surfaces for hours, so the simplest solution is to clean them with human-friendly cleaning materials. From the dining table to the remote control to toys – all these surfaces are covered in bacteria that can be killed through cleaning. However, always be reasonable and avoid over cleaning your home, because there is no way to keep your home so sterile that no harm will ever come to your children.

4. Don’t share

It’s very important to explain to your children that sharing is a wonderful thing, but if they or the children they’re playing with have a cold, it’s the last thing they should do. As noted above, many bacteria live on different surfaces, including toys, so it’s best to keep those toys from direct contact with the nose, eyes, and mouth of children and in general. It is recommended to clean those playing surfaces thoroughly before use, and if these toys or things are used on a daily basis, you should simply not share them with other children.

5. Correct and immunizing eating

There are two vitamins that can help prevent colds – vitamin C and vitamin D. A study conducted at the University of Helsinki in Finland found that a high intake of foods rich in vitamin C can prevent colds, especially among people who physically exert themselves in short time periods and those living in very cold environments.

As for all other people, vitamin C has long been thought to be an ideal contraceptive for colds, and eating fruits and vegetables rich in it can prevent the next cold. Vitamin D is an important nutrient for the body’s overall health and studies have shown that people with low levels of vitamin D are more susceptible to infection and diseases, including colds. Everyone knows that the sun is an excellent source of vitamin D, but in its absence in the gray winter months, your child should be getting it from various food sources such as salmon, eggs, and mushrooms.

Symptoms of the common cold

You should know that when you talk about a cold, many parents think it’s an easy illness that passes after a few short days, but in fact, a cold can last between 6 and 14 days.

A sore throat – the first sign of a cold, lasts from 5 to 9 days.

A runny nose – starts to appear on the second or third day of the disease and lasts for 10-14 days.

A cough – appears on day 5-6 of the disease and may last up to three weeks.

Fever – In half of the children their temperature will climb to 100-102 degrees F by the second to third day of the disease. If it remains high even after that, consult a doctor.

Source: Internet, CDC & Others

The views expressed in this article should not be considered as a substitute for a physician’s advice. Always make sure to seek a doctor or a professional’s advice before proceeding with the home treatment plan.


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FLU 2021

Latest News (from the CDC):

  • The percentage of outpatient visits due to respiratory illness is trending upwards and is above the national baseline. Influenza is contributing to levels of respiratory illness, but other respiratory viruses are also circulating. The relative contribution of influenza varies by location.
  • Hospitalizations for influenza are starting to increase.
  • The first two influenza-associated pediatric deaths this season were reported this week. Both cases were associated with influenza A virus infections.
  • The flu season is just getting started. There’s still time to get vaccinated. An annual flu vaccine is the best way to protect against flu and its potentially serious complications. CDC recommends everyone 6 months and older get a flu vaccine.
  • Influenza activity is increasing, with the eastern and central parts of the country seeing the largest increases and the western part of the country reporting lower levels of influenza virus circulation.
  • The majority of influenza viruses detected are A(H3N2). Most influenza A(H3N2) infections have occurred among children and young adults ages 5-24 years; however, the proportion of infections occurring among adults age 25 years and older has been increasing
  • Everyone 6 months and older should get a flu vaccine every season with rare exceptions.
  • Vaccination is particularly important for people who are at higher risk of serious complications from influenza.
  • You can get a COVID-19 vaccine and a flu vaccine at the same time.

Growing flu

Source: Internet, CDC & Others

The views expressed in this article should not be considered as a substitute for a physician’s advice. Always make sure to seek a doctor or a professional’s advice before proceeding with the home treatment plan.


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Yoga for better back

Pregnancy can be brutal on women’s health. One common problem after delivery that women experience is chronic lower back pain. Although it is not limited to women, those of us who suffer from chronic back pain, which is the most common and disturbing pain, know how difficult it is sometimes to fall asleep at night. When you don’t sleep well at night, the pain only gets worse, kind of like a snowball effect. In turn, it harms the normal routine of our lives and makes it difficult for us to relax all day long. If this is the case for you, you can release and relieve that annoying back pain.

1. Wind-Relieving Pose
The Wind-Relieving Pose, or as it is called in yoga: “Pavanamuktasana,” is designed to release your spine, especially its lower part, within moments. In addition, this position allows the bowels to be accelerated and regulated, so we’d recommend trying it in the morning.

How to do it:

Lie on your back, relax your muscles and bend your knees up.
Take a deep breath of air, then hug your knees with both arms.
Release the breath, continue to hug your knees keeping them close to your chest.
Repeat the exercise several times: on each inhale move your legs away from your chest, and each time you exhale, bring them back. Be sure to take long breaths.
Perform about 8 to 10 reps – about 1 minute of exercise.

Pavanamukthasana


2. Legs Up the Wall Pose
The next position is to release tension from the back and legs, relax the chest, and allow the lungs to fill with air and oxygen before going to bed.

How to do it:

Place a folded pillow near the wall or on the edge of the bed.

Lie on your back with your buttocks against the pillow. Press your buttocks toward the wall and then straighten your legs up and place them against the wall.

Spread your arms to the sides, and try to stretch and widen your chest. Relax the rest of your body, and breathe calmly.

Stay in this position for 1-2 minutes, then lower your legs off the wall.

Wall Pose Yoga

3. Reclining butterfly pose

The Reclining butterfly pose will have a positive effect on your back and will allow you to release its most internal muscles, those located beneath the upper layers of the skin. There are two steps that are important to perform during this pose.

How to do it:

Step 1:

Lie on your back with two rolled towels underneath you, one under your waist and one under your neck.
Bend your legs to each side (like a butterfly’s wings flapping) and remain as loose as possible. At the same time, move your head from side to side, without straining your neck and back. The head and leg movement can be done on the same side or opposite sides, whichever is easier for you.

Try releasing and loosening your body as much as possible. Feel the waves of your movement penetrate your spine. Perform this step for one minute.

Step 2:

Turn around and lie on your stomach with your arms spread out, feet resting on the bed or mattress, and a pillow or rolled towel under your forehead.

Move your legs from side to side, and try to feel the vibrations pass through your entire relaxed body. Keep moving and perform this step for another minute.

Reclining butterfly Pose

4. The Shavasana Pose

The Shavasana Pose, whose literal meaning is “the corpse pose” is used by yogis to relax their bodies at the end of a strained workout. Doing it before bedtime will help you relax and fall asleep quickly and easily, in addition to relieving back pain.

How to do it:

Lie on your back, gently spread your arms to your sides with your palms facing up.

Place a rolled towel or a pillow under your head and neck.

Slowly start relaxing your body from the bottom up: start with your toes and go up to your legs, hips, stomach, fingers, arms, and so on until you reach the top of your head.

Relax each part on an inhalation and exhalation.

Do 20 cycles of breathing: breathe in and breathe out slowly.

After 20 cycles, stop counting and breathe freely.

Let your thoughts float and avoid concentrating on a specific thought.

You’ll slowly feel your surroundings becoming blurred, and your whole body will be relaxed and loose.

This is the best time to cover up and fall into a nice deep sleep.

Shavasana


Source: Internet & Others

The views expressed in this article should not be considered as a substitute for a physician’s advice. Always make sure to seek a doctor or a professional’s advice before proceeding with the home treatment plan.


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Headache Remedies

woman holding her head
Headache!

Lavender Oil

Not only does lavender smell great — it’s also a useful home remedy for headaches and migraine pain. Lavender oil can be either inhaled or applied topically. Two to four drops for every two to three cups of boiling water are recommended when inhaling lavender-oil vapors as a headache treatment. Unlike many medicinal oils, this home remedy can also be safely applied externally without the need to dilute it. Lavender oil should not be taken orally.

Peppermint Oil

Peppermint is a soothing home remedy that has been shown to benefit tension headaches. This fresh-smelling oil has vaso-constricting and vaso-dilating properties, which help control blood flow in the body. Headaches and migraine pain are often due to poor blood flow, and peppermint oil helps to open and close the vessels that promote flow. Peppermint home remedies also open up the sinuses so that more oxygen can get into the bloodstream.

Basil Oil

Basil, the strong-scented herb used as a topping for pizzas and pastas, certainly tastes and smells good. And for people in need of a natural headache treatment, the oil derived from basil plants can also be a useful home remedy. Basil works as a muscle relaxant, so it is especially helpful for headaches caused by tension and tight muscles.

DIY Scalp Massage

Do-it-yourself scalp massages can be an effective way to alleviate migraine pain, and they feel great. Researchers in Brazil showed that massaging the greater occipital nerve — the area in the back of the head, at the base of the skull — reduces migraine pain. Massage in general has been identified as a useful home remedy for headaches, especially reflexology (massaging reflex points on the hands and feet)

Feverfew

Feverfew, as its name suggests, is used to treat fever, but it’s most commonly known as an herbal headache treatment. This home remedy became popular in the 1980s, when a landmark study in Great Britain showed that 70 percent of participants had less migraine pain after taking feverfew daily. Since then, more studies have demonstrated feverfew’s benefit in preventing and treating migraine pain. One study showed improvement in migraine pain among people who took daily feverfew in combination with white willow, another herbal home remedy, which contains properties similar to aspirin.

Flaxseed

Some headaches are caused by inflammation, which can be reduced by consuming omega-3 fatty acids. Flaxseed can help provide headache relief because it’s rich in omega-3s. Flaxseed can be used as a home remedy in several forms, including as an oil and ground or whole seeds

Buckwheat

Buckwheat’s usefulness as a home remedy for headaches and migraine pain comes from a flavonoid known as rutin. Flavonoids are phytochemicals, which are found in plants, and have been shown to contain antioxidant properties, which counteract damage to cells. In addition, researchers in Taiwan have demonstrated the effects of flavonoids on inflammation, a common cause of headaches.

Photo by David Garrison on Pexels.com

Source: Internet & Others

The views expressed in this article should not be considered as a substitute for a physician’s advice. Always make sure to seek a doctor or a professional’s advice before proceeding with the home treatment plan.


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Is it Flu or Cold or Covid?

Flu season is in beginning, and preparation is your key to staying healthy. Unfortunately, despite your best efforts, the flu can still strike. If it does, early detection and appropriate responses are essential to treating this draining bug. There’s just one problem: How do you know if you actually have the flu?

The only way to know for certain if your sickness is indeed the flu is with a flu test. But then there are also some identifiable signs that could mean you need to see a doctor, and other signs that you likely don’t have the flu.

Influenza (flu) and the common cold are both contagious respiratory illnesses, but they are caused by different viruses. Flu is caused by influenza viruses only, whereas the common cold can be caused by a number of different viruses, including rhinoviruses, parainfluenza, and seasonal coronaviruses.

Why should we take this seriously?

https://i0.wp.com/en-volve.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/covid-vs-flu-deaths.jpg?w=611&ssl=1
Source: FREOPP

Flu or Cold?

Cold or Flu?
Source: CDC
The Coronavirus conundrum: flu, common cold, seasonal ...
Comparing Flu, cold, allergy and covid

Similarities between Flu and Covid:

Both COVID-19 and flu can have varying degrees of signs and symptoms, ranging from no symptoms (asymptomatic) to severe symptoms. Common symptoms that COVID-19 and flu share include:

  • Fever or feeling feverish/having chills
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Fatigue (tiredness)
  • Sore throat
  • Runny or stuffy nose
  • Muscle pain or body aches
  • Headache
  • Vomiting and diarrhea
  • Change in or loss of taste or smell, although this is more frequent with COVID-19.

Differences of Covid:

  • If a person has COVID-19, it could take them longer to experience symptoms than if they had flu.
  • Typically, a person experiences symptoms about 5 days after being infected, but symptoms can appear 2 to 14 days after infection.
  • It’s possible for people to spread the virus for about 2 days before experiencing signs or symptoms (or possibly earlier) and remain contagious for at least 10 days after signs or symptoms first appeared. If someone is asymptomatic or their symptoms go away, it’s possible to remain contagious for at least 10 days after testing positive for COVID-19. People who are hospitalized with severe disease and people with weakened immune systems can be contagious for 20 days or longer.
  • While the virus that causes COVID-19 and flu viruses are thought to spread in similar ways, the virus that causes COVID-19 is generally more contagious than flu viruses. Also, COVID-19 has been observed to have more superspreading events than flu. This means the virus that causes COVID-19 can quickly and easily spread to a lot of people and result in continual spreading among people as time progresses.
  • Overall, COVID-19 seems to cause more serious illnesses in some people. Serious COVID-19 illness resulting in hospitalization and death can occur even in healthy people. Some people that had COVID-19 can go on to develop post-COVD conditions or multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS)

Source: Internet & Others

The views expressed in this article should not be considered as a substitute for a physician’s advice. Always make sure to seek a doctor or a professional’s advice before proceeding with the home treatment plan.


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Sinus Infection!

The sinuses are such a complex part of our bodies that not many people are fully aware of where they are or how they work. Sinusitis, is inflammation of the mucous membranes that line the sinuses resulting in symptoms that may include thick nasal mucus, a plugged nose, and facial pain. Other signs and symptoms may include fever, headaches, a poor sense of smell, sore throat, and a cough. It is defined as acute sinusitis if it lasts less than 4 weeks, and as chronic sinusitis if it lasts for more than 12 weeks.

Sinusitis can be caused by infection, allergies, air pollution, or structural problems in the nose. Most cases are caused by a viral infection. Recurrent episodes are more likely in persons with asthma, cystic fibrosis, and poor immune function.

An infected sinus can be a very frustrating thing, which is why we’ve gathered a list of five of the most common symptoms below:

1. Your face hurts

Soreness is usually an indication that you really gave your muscles a challenge. But if it’s your face that’s sore, you might have a problem. Facial pain may be a sign that your sinuses are infected and blocked.

2. Your teeth ache

A toothache may not be due to problems with your teeth at all. In fact, “dental pain is probably the most overlooked sinus infection symptom. This is usually related to a maxillary (or cheek) sinusitis as the upper tooth roots will often extend close to the sinus.

3. You can’t get rid of your headache

Many different issues can cause a headache: too much movement, dehydration or even just being tired. However, if you’ve had a chronic headache for a number of days, then pressure may be a sign that you have a sinus infection. If you think this may be the case, visit your doctor since most sinus infections are viral and won’t respond to antibiotics.

4. You can’t smell

If you’re having trouble smelling both sweet scents and nasty odors, then you may have a sinus infection. Loss of sense of smell can occur with sinusitis from the inflammation around the olfactory, or smell, organ. That’s why such symptoms indicate that you’re beginning to come down with a potential sinus infection.

5. You feel far too much pressure If you wake up and find that your head feels cloudy, heavy, and generally uncomfortable, then your sinuses may be to blame. Before your sinuses get infected, they first start off being blocked. This uncomfortable blockage is what leads all of that tension to build up and feel intense, potentially signposting that more sinus infections symptoms will be coming your way shortly.

Solutions to Sinusitis

Antibiotics are not needed for many sinus infections. Your child’s doctor may give an antibiotic prescription but suggest that you wait 2–3 days to see if your child is still sick before filling it.

  • Clean your hands.
  • Receive recommended vaccines, such as the flu vaccine and pneumococcal vaccine.
  • Avoid close contact with people who have colds or other upper respiratory infections.
  • Don’t smoke and avoid secondhand smoke.
  • Use a clean humidifier to moisten the air at home.
  • Put a warm compress over the nose and forehead to help relieve sinus pressure.
  • Use a decongestant or saline nasal spray.
  • Breathe in steam from a bowl of hot water or shower.

Source: Internet & Others

The views expressed in this article should not be considered as a substitute for a physician’s advice. Always make sure to seek a doctor or a professional’s advice before proceeding with the home treatment plan.


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Undiagnosed Allergies

Allergies are more common than ever with almost half of the population worldwide having experienced an allergic reaction at least once in their lifetime. Up to 40 percent of children suffer from allergic rhinitis. And children are more likely to develop allergies if one or both parents have allergies. Often, we can simply misattribute an allergy symptom as an age-related change in our body, a flu or some other health condition.

Normally, allergens are harmless. But when a person has allergies, the body thinks these allergens are harmful. The body then attacks allergens with antibodies called immunoglobulin E (IgE). These antibodies are attached to special cells called mast cells. Allergens stick to the antibodies. This makes the mast cells release histamine and other chemicals causing an allergic reaction. When the chemicals irritate nearby nasal tissue, this causes nasal allergy symptoms. When this happens in the lungs’ breathing tubes, it can cause asthma symptoms such as cough and wheeze. When the reaction involves the whole body, this can be a severe allergic reaction.

sick little girl blowing nose with tissue lying in bed
Allergies in kids

Allergies can affect anyone. It doesn’t matter regardless of age, gender, race, or socioeconomic status. Generally, allergies are more common in children. But allergies can happen at any age. And they can come back after being in remission for many years. Allergies tend to happen in families. But the exact reason isn’t yet understood. Allergy symptoms often happen slowly over time.

These are some silent signs of allergies that you might mistake for something else.

1. A (Kind Of) Stuffy Nose and Sore Throat

Long-lasting sneezing, with a stuffy or runny nose, may signal the presence of allergic rhinitis—the collection of symptoms that affect the nose when you have an allergic reaction to something you breathe in and that lands on the lining inside the nose.

If you have specifically noticed asthma symptoms, such as shortness of breath, coughing, wheezing, your kid may have allergies.

2. Itchy, Irritated or Swollen Skin

Does your skin feel itchy and irritated, even though you’re moisturizing it and don’t see any rash or breakouts? Or do you wake up with a somewhat swollen face or eyelids in the morning? These signs may be a symptom of an allergy.

And though it is true that people with dry skin can also experience skin itching, especially in the winter, a constant itchiness should still be a warning sign for you. If swelling and itchiness is accompanied by other symptoms, such as headaches, a stuffed nose, or any other symptom we mention on this list, it may be caused by an allergy.

Foods, medications, supplements, fragrances, detergents, or anything else, really, can provoke these symptoms. You can be allergic to specific laundry detergents, for example, which can cause headaches, irritability, swelling and skin itching because we use it to clean our clothes, sheets and towels.

3. Experiencing Headaches, Fatigue and Irritability

Allergies can take a toll on your mental health, too, causing irritability and nervousness. It makes sense, too, if you think about it, as it is very nerve-wracking indeed to feel slightly sick, itchy and swollen without a definite idea if it’s just a new normal for you, or a cause of concern. Other related symptoms are exhaustion, mental tiredness and headaches. These two symptoms make you feel less focused and alert, too, which can really affect your productivity and life satisfaction.

4. Persisting Rash or a Recurrent Flare Up

If you experience skin rashes that flare up from time to time, possibly every season, it may indicate that you have an undiagnosed allergy. It doesn’t have to be allergic hives either, rosacea, eczema, acne and other skin conditions can all worsen due to an allergy. Also, keep in mind that allergies are often systemic, which means that a rash on your back or on the tops of your hands, for example, can be caused by a food allergy or even an allergy to cat fur, and not necessarily a product that contacted with your hands or back.

5. A Persisting Cold or Sinus Infection

A cold or sinus infection that doesn’t go away for a long time may be an allergy in disguise, especially when a treatment with antibiotics proves ineffective. This is especially true about seasonal allergies. In fact, patients with serious undiagnosed allergies often mistake them for a respiratory infection and complain to the doctor about a cold or sinusitis, when in reality they just have an allergy.

6. Sensitive or Watery Eyes

One of the most common contact allergy symptoms are uncontrollably itchy eyes, but it rarely happens that you have such a strong reaction to an allergen that your eyes immediately turn red and start itching like crazy. If you feel that your eyes become more sensitive or watery when you’re outside and it’s windy, for example, it may indicate a dust allergy. It is also often the case that some skincare or makeup products can make your eyes watery or red. As it is the case with all of these symptoms, you should observe and see if any other allergy symptoms accompany it, and if so, it may be worth a visit to a doctor.

7. Feeling Sick Only Outdoors or In a Specific Building

Are you experiencing headaches and itchiness only when you’re in school? Or, on the other hand, you feel tired and your nose is runny only when you spend time outside? It can mean that you have an allergy to a specific object found outdoors or indoors, be it pollen, mold, animals or anything else.

Allergy Triggers

Many things can trigger allergic reactions. But the most common triggers or allergens are:

  • Tree, grass, and weed pollens
  • Natural rubber latex
  • Molds
  • Dust mites
  • Animal dander, urine, and oil from skin
  • Foods
  • Medicines
  • Feathers
  • Bee stings
  • Pests such as cockroaches and mice

Allergy treatment: The 3 most effective ways to treat allergies are avoidance, allergy shots (immunotherapy), and medicine. Avoidance means staying away from something that gives you an allergic reaction.

Suggestions for staying away from allergens are:

  • Stay indoors when the pollen count is high and on windy days.
  • Control dust in the home, particularly your child’s bedroom.
  • Use air conditioning instead of opening the windows.
  • Put a dehumidifier in damp areas of the home. But remember to clean it often.
  • After playing outside when the pollen counts are high, have your child take a bath or shower, wash his or her hair, and change clothes.

Take vacations in areas where pollen is not as common, such as near the ocean.

Takeaway: If you experience a combination of the symptoms for an extended period of time, try to look for patterns and understand what product, object or animal could be triggering these symptoms. Keep a diary.

You physician or an allergologist will also help you figure out what might be causing your allergy and if it’s maybe something else, as well as be able to prescribe a suitable treatment. In the end, it is important to treat even minor allergy symptoms, as they can really affect your daily life, confidence and life satisfaction.

Source: Internet & Others

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio on Pexels.com

The views expressed in this article should not be considered as a substitute for a physician’s advice. Always make sure to seek a doctor or a professional’s advice before proceeding with the home treatment plan.


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Natural Remedy for Migraine

Headaches, including migraines, are extremely common. Because headaches can stem from a variety of causes, some headache sufferers seek treatment on a near-daily basis. Fortunately, there are several home-remedy treatments that can help alleviate migraine pain and other types of headaches.

faceless woman covering face with hands while sitting at home
Migraine sufferer

Foods that trigger Migraine

  • foods with nitrates including hot
    dogs, deli meats, bacon, and sausage
  • chocolate
  • cheese that contains the
    naturally-occurring compound tyramine, such as blue, feta, cheddar, Parmesan,
    and Swiss
  • alcohol, especially red wine
  • foods that contain monosodium
    glutamate (MSG), a flavor enhancer
  • foods that are very cold such as ice
    cream or iced drinks
  • processed foods
  • pickled foods
  • beans
  • dried fruits
  • cultured dairy products such as
    buttermilk, sour cream, and yogurt

Foods to add to your diet

Magnesium deficiency is linked to headaches and migraines. Studies show magnesium oxide supplementation helps prevent migraines with aura. It may also prevent menstrual-related migraines. You can get magnesium from foods that include:

  • almonds
  • sesame seeds
  • sunflower seeds
  • Brazil nuts
  • cashews
  • peanut butter
  • oatmeal
  • eggs
  • milk

Headache Home Remedy: Lavender Oil

Not only does lavender smell great — it’s also a useful home remedy for headaches and migraine pain. Lavender oil can be either inhaled or applied topically. Two to four drops for every two to three cups of boiling water are recommended when inhaling lavender-oil vapors as a headache treatment. Unlike many medicinal oils, this home remedy can also be safely applied externally without the need to dilute it. Lavender oil should not be taken orally.

Headache Home Remedy: Peppermint Oil

Peppermint is a soothing home remedy that has been shown to benefit tension headaches. This fresh-smelling oil has vaso-constricting and vaso-dilating properties, which help control blood flow in the body. Headaches and migraine pain are often due to poor blood flow, and peppermint oil helps to open and close the vessels that promote flow. Peppermint home remedies also open up the sinuses so that more oxygen can get into the bloodstream.

Headache Home Remedy: Basil Oil

Basil, the strong-scented herb used as a topping for pizzas and pastas, certainly tastes and smells good. And for people in need of a natural headache treatment, the oil derived from basil plants can also be a useful home remedy. Basil works as a muscle relaxant, so it is especially helpful for headaches caused by tension and tight muscles.

Headache Home Remedy: DIY Scalp Massage

Do-it-yourself scalp massages can be an effective way to alleviate migraine pain, and they feel great. Researchers in Brazil showed that massaging the greater occipital nerve — the area in the back of the head, at the base of the skull — reduces migraine pain. Massage in general has been identified as a useful home remedy for headaches, especially reflexology (massaging reflex points on the hands and feet)

Headache Home Remedy: Feverfew

Feverfew, as its name suggests, is used to treat fever, but it’s most commonly known as an herbal headache treatment. This home remedy became popular in the 1980s, when a landmark study in Great Britain showed that 70 percent of participants had less migraine pain after taking feverfew daily. Since then, more studies have demonstrated feverfew’s benefit in preventing and treating migraine pain. One study showed improvement in migraine pain among people who took daily feverfew in combination with white willow, another herbal home remedy, which contains properties similar to aspirin.

Headache Home Remedy: Ginger

Ginger is known to ease nausea caused by many conditions, including migraines. It may also have other migraine benefits. According to research , ginger powder decreased migraine severity and duration as well as the prescription drug sumatriptan, and with fewer side effects.

Headache Home Remedy: Flaxseed

Some headaches are caused by inflammation, which can be reduced by consuming omega-3 fatty acids. Flaxseed can help provide headache relief because it’s rich in omega-3s. Flaxseed can be used as a home remedy in several forms, including as an oil and ground or whole seeds

Headache Home Remedy: Buckwheat

Buckwheat’s usefulness as a home remedy for headaches and migraine pain comes from a flavonoid known as rutin. Flavonoids are phytochemicals, which are found in plants, and have been shown to contain antioxidant properties, which counteract damage to cells. In addition, researchers in Taiwan have demonstrated the effects of flavonoids on inflammation, a common cause of headaches.

Headache Home Remedy: Yoga

Yoga is thought to help improve blood flow and reduce muscle tension, which can help relieve symptoms for people who get migraines. A comprehensive research compared conventional migraine treatment with and without the addition of regular yoga practice. The researchers found that the group who participated in a yoga program had greater relief than the group who joined in conventional treatment alone.

Source: Internet, Healthline, MedNews, & Others

P Photo by Keira Burton on Pexels.com

The views expressed in this article should not be considered as a substitute for a physician’s advice. Always make sure to seek a doctor or a professional’s advice before proceeding with the home treatment plan.


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Food to improve our immune system

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Photo by Ella Olsson on Pexels.com

Our immune system’s ability to fight disease depends on the food that we consume. The immune system and white blood cells work together to deal with various infections, such as bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites, and even treat cancer cells. The normal range of white blood cells in the body is 4,300 -10,800 cells per microliter of blood.

Below you will find the recommended nutrients and foods that can be used to improve the production of white blood cells:

Vitamin C

It is very important to include different vitamins in your daily diet, but vitamin C is the most important for increasing the production of white blood cells. Foods that include citrus, chili, broccoli and green and red peppers are rich in vitamin C, making them essential to your diet. Also, it should be noted that broccoli not only helps to increase white blood cells, it also contains many antioxidants thanks to its high vitamins A and E content.

Zinc

The consumption of zinc accelerates immune system function, which is linked to increased production of white blood cells. Studies have shown that zinc deficiency may increase the risk of infection, and other studies have found evidence that zinc intake of 75 mg or more per day may reduce the duration of a cold and also the severity of the symptoms associated with it. Natural food sources include beans, sunflower seeds, chicken, nuts, whole grains, pumpkin seeds, wheat grass, and spinach.

Folic acid

Folic acid is a water-soluble vitamin that is needed to create and maintain new cells, and the consumption of this nutrient is especially important during periods of rapid cell division, such as during pregnancy or during the development and growth of infants. Vegetables such as spinach, turnips, peas, legumes and other fruits and vegetables are rich in folic acid, so it is recommended to add them to your regular weekly menu.

Selenium

The recommended daily amount of selenium for an adult is 55 micrograms, and a lack of this mineral may increase the chances of developing angina, myocardial infarction, and coronary heart disease. In addition, selenium can increase the production of white blood cells and can be found in beef, tuna, salmon, chicken, beans, and Brazil nuts.

Beta-carotene

This substance helps protect the thymus gland, which creates immune system cells. Foods that contain beta-carotene increase the production of white blood cells, and they have the ability to fight infections if you make sure to consume them daily. Daily consumption of this nutrient should range from 2 -7 mg per day and it can be found in fruits and vegetables such as carrots, tomatoes, oranges, loquat, pumpkin, mangos and dark leafy green vegetables.

Turmeric

Turmeric is a great anti-inflammatory substance that relieves both types of arthritis; Osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. In addition, the main active ingredient is curcumin, which has proven its ability to reduce inflammation and fever, thanks to its positive effect on the proper functioning of white blood cells.

Kale

Just one cup of kale will give you all the vitamin A you need a day, which can help your body fight cancer cells. Also, kale increases the production of white blood cells and helps antibodies respond to invasive infections and even neutralize them.

Garlic

Garlic contains elements that stimulate the immune system. Furthermore, it has an impressive ability to fight infections, thanks to the large concentration of allicin, created by crushing fresh garlic cloves.

Prebiotic and Probiotic

A high-fiber plant-rich diet with plenty of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and legumes appear to support the growth and maintenance of beneficial microbes. Certain helpful microbes break down fibers into short chain fatty acids, which have been shown to stimulate immune cell activity. These fibers are sometimes called prebiotics because they feed microbes. Therefore, a diet containing probiotic and prebiotic foods may be beneficial. Probiotic foods contain live helpful bacteria, and prebiotic foods contain fiber and oligosaccharides that feed and maintain healthy colonies of those bacteria.

  • Probiotic foods include kefir, yogurt with live active cultures, fermented vegetables, sauerkraut, tempeh, kombucha tea, kimchi, and miso.
  • Prebiotic foods include garlic, onions, leeks, asparagus, Jerusalem artichokes, dandelion greens, bananas, and seaweed. However, a more general rule is to eat a variety of fruits, vegetables, beans, and whole grains for dietary prebiotics.

Green tea

Cell studies have shown that tea catechins such as those found in green tea can prevent flu and some cold viruses from replicating and can increase immune activity. Human trials are still limited.

Takeaway

  1. Eat a balanced diet with whole fruits, vegetables, lean proteins, whole grains, and plenty of water.
  2. Perform moderate exercise
  3. Sleep 7-9 hours every night
  4. Manage stress
  5. Wash your hands

Source: Internet & Other sources

The views expressed in this article should not be considered as a substitute for a physician’s advice. Always make sure to seek a doctor or a professional’s advice before proceeding with the home treatment plan.

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Metallic Taste in Your Mouth!

If your mouth constantly tastes like old pennies, you’re not alone. There are actually several different conditions that may cause this to arise, some of which are far less serious than others. Below, we’ve listed some of the most common causes for a metallic taste in your mouth.

1. Over-the-counter vitamins or medicines

Multivitamins that contain heavy metals (such as zinc, copper or chromium) or certain types of cold remedies (like zinc lozenges) can cause a metallic taste to develop in your mouth. Calcium or iron supplements can cause this too, as can prenatal vitamins. The taste will often go away as your body breaks down the vitamins or medicine. If it doesn’t, check your dosage to ensure you are not taking too much. Also if you lack vitamin B-12, your nerves might not function properly, and you might develop tinnitus or a metallic taste.

2. Infections

Certain kinds of infections, such as colds, sinusitis, and upper respiratory infections can alter your sense of taste. Such sensory changes are typically temporary and will usually go away as soon as you get better.

3. Poor oral hygiene

If you don’t brush your teeth and floss regularly, then you may end up with teeth and gum problems like gingivitis, periodontitis and certain kinds of tooth infections. These usually get better with a prescription from your dentist, with any metallic tastes leaving along with them.

4. Prescription drugs

These medicines include the gout medicine allopurinol, antibiotics such as tetracycline, lithium, used in the treatment of certain psychiatric conditions, and particular cardiac drugs. Certain drugs which cause your mouth to go dry may also be the cause, since they may be absorbed close to your taste buds.

5. Dementia

Persons with dementia often experience taste abnormalities. This is because there is a connection between the taste buds and the brain. As a result, taste abnormalities often arise when the part of the brain related to taste is not functioning properly.

6. Chemical exposure

If you find that you have been exposed to lead or mercury, such as through accidental inhalation, then you may find that you have a metallic taste in your mouth, which should be seen to by a professional.

7. Cancer treatment

A metallic taste in your mouth may also arise if you are being treated for cancer via radiation therapy or chemotherapy. This is a normal side effect and should not be anything to worry about.

8. Pregnancy

During some of the earliest stages of pregnancy, some expectant mothers find that their sense of taste has been altered drastically. One of those changes may be a metallic taste in the mouth. Consult your doctor if it is causing you any distress.

9. Hay Fever or allergic rhinitis

Hay fever can leave a metallic taste in your mouth due to inflamed nasal passages that disrupt your ability to taste.

10. Covid-19

COVID-19 is an illness caused by a strand of coronavirus discovered in late 2019. COVID-19 can cause a wide range of flu-like symptoms 2 to 14 days after exposure.

11. Pine nut syndrome

Pine nut syndrome is a rare reaction to pine nuts that begins 12 to 48 hours after eating them. It causes a bitter metallic taste in your mouth that can last up to a month.

Treating the underlying cause

  • Allergies are usually treated by making lifestyle changes to reduce contact with dust, mold, and other allergens. Non-drowsy antihistamines are available over the counter to help you manage your symptoms.
  • If you have a viral infection, such as a sinus infection or COVID-19, it’s important to stay hydrated and get plenty of rest to allow your body to recuperate. Nasal decongestants may help you improve your breathing. Ibuprofen and other anti-inflammatories may help with body aches and pains.
  • If you’re experiencing shortness of breath, a fever over 103 degrees, or pressure in your chest, you should seek medical attention.
  • If your medication is causing your symptoms, a doctor may recommend changing your dose or the medication.

Source: Internet & Other sources

The views expressed in this article should not be considered as a substitute for a physician’s advice. Always make sure to seek a doctor or a professional’s advice before proceeding with the home treatment plan.


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NATURAL WAYS TO FIGHT MALARIA, DENGUE FEVER AND CHIKUNGUNYA

Neem oil: Neem has a number of great benefits for the human body, but apart from being an elixir for your health, neem is also a great mosquito-repellent. A study published in the Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association found that mixing neem oil with coconut oil in a 1:1 ratio is a really effective way to keep mosquitoes at bay. Being a potent antibacterial, anti-fungal, antiviral and anti-protozoal agent, neem lends your skin a particular smell that wards off mosquitoes. To make an effective insecticide mix neem oil and coconut oil in equal portions and rub it on your body (all exposed parts). This will protect you from mosquito bites for at least eight hours.

Eucalyptus and lemon oil: Recommended by the CDC (Center for Disease Control) as an effective insect-repellent the mixture of lemon oil and eucalyptus oil is extremely effective in repelling mosquitoes – naturally. The way lemon oil and eucalyptus oil works is due to its active component cineole, which has both antiseptic and insect-repellent properties when applied to the skin. The best part about this mixture is that it is natural and does not come with all the ill effects of chemical mosquito repellents. To use this mixture, mix lemon oil and eucalyptus oil in equal proportions and use it on your body. (Read:Neem and tulsi, effective remedies to keep malaria out of your home)

Camphor: Using camphor as a repellent also works wonders. Made from the extract of a tree, this compound has been found to have the longest mosquito repellent activity when compared to other natural products. Light camphor in a room and close all the doors and windows. Leave it this way for about fifteen to twenty minutes and go back to a mosquito free environment.

Tulsi: According to data published in the Parasitology Research Journal tulsi was extremely effective in killing mosquito larvae and helped keep mosquitoes away. Moreover, according Ayurveda simply planting a tulsi shrub near your window is all you need to keep mosquitoes away. The plant has properties that do not allow mosquitoes to breed and will prevent them from entering your house.

Garlic: Is a great way to keep mosquitoes at bay. It might smell bad, but that is exactly why mosquitoes stay away. The strong and pungent odour of garlic is known to prevent mosquito bites and even prevents them from entering your home. So to use this remedy you could crush up a few pods of garlic, boil it in water and use the water to spray around the room you want to keep mosquito free. If you are the adventurous type (or really hate mosquitoes), you could also spray it on yourself to avoid being bitten.

Tea tree oil: It has numerous benefits for your skin and hair and is a very powerful antibacterial and antifungal agent as well, but did you know that tea tree oil is also perfect to drive mosquitoes away? Well, the odour and its antifungal and antibacterial properties help prevent mosquitoes from biting you and drive them away. So if you want to use this remedy you could either rub some tea tree oil on your skin or add a few drops of it to a vaporizer. This way the scent of tea tree oil permeates the air keeping mosquitoes at bay.

Mint : If the scent of mint relaxes you then this remedy is for you. According to a study published in the Journal of Bioresource Technology {4} found that mint oil and mint extract is as effective as any other insect repellent. You can use mint leaves and essence in a number of ways. You can choose to use it in a vaporizer to help fill the room with the scent of mint, apply the oil on your body or plant the shrub outside your rooms window. Alternatively you could mix a bit of mint-flavored mouthwash with water and spray it around your home.

Lavender: Not only does it smell absolutely divine but it is also a great way to keep those pesky mosquitoes at bay. The scent of this flower is often quite strong for mosquitoes making them unable to bite. So to use this home remedy, use lavender oil as a natural room freshener or apply it on your skin (you can mix it with your cream) for best results.


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NEWS: FOOD BORNE ILLNESS

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service joined forces to create the Interagency Food Safety Analytics Collaboration and issue the report. The study used data from nearly 1,000 outbreaks that occurred from 1998 to 2012. Among its key findings, it broke down which types of food are most likely to harbor common types of bacteria:

E. coli: More than 80 percent of cases were a result of eating beef and row crops such as leafy green vegetables.

Salmonella: Though this type of bacteria can end up in a large variety of foods, 77 percent of cases were related to eggs, chicken, beef, bean sprouts, pork and seeded fruits and vegetables such as melons and tomatoes.

Campylobacter: Dairy is the primary culprit for infections caused by this type of bacteria, with 66 percent coming from raw milk and cheeses such as unpasteurized queso fresco. Chicken accounted for 8 percent of campylobacter infections.

Listeria: Though there was less data on this type of bacteria, the report finds fruits such as cantaloupe accounted for about half of all listeria infections; dairy was to blame in about 31 percent of cases.


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RESEARCH NEWS: CARAMEL COLOR IS A CARCINOGEN

STUDY FINDINGS:

A new study has revealed that presence of carcinogens in the caramel color added to cold drinks increases the risk of cancer among people with high consumption. The chemical, 4-methylimidazole (4-MEI), is produced as a byproduct when caramel color is formed in soft drinks. Findings of the study have been published in the journal PLOS ONE. The chemical is also found in roasted foods, grilled meats or coffee.

Read more:

FOOD FAKES – DID YOU KNOW?

DANGERS OF FOOD COLOR ADDITIVES


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WINTRY WEATHER – HOW TO PROTECT YOUR CHILD

This is Accuweather’s prediction for this weekend.

It sounds brutal. Let’s avoid falling sick. Know that.

· Young children generate less body heat, and get cold more quickly than adults.

· It is better to dress your child in layers of clothing that can be put on and taken off easily.

· Infants being pulled in a sled need extra bundling. Because they aren’t moving, they can’t generate body heat the way a playing child can.

TIPS TO MANAGE KIDS IN WINTER

· Children shouldn’t play outside alone. Establish a buddy system. Better yet, avoid outdoors. Never send children outside in extreme weather conditions such as snowstorms.

· Check often to see that your child is warm and dry. Younger children should take regular breaks and come inside for a warm drink.

· If your child’s feet and hands are warm, what they are wearing is usually good. Dress your child in layers of clothing that can be put on and taken off easily. Wear a hat because a lot of body heat is lost through the head. Keep ears covered at all times. Wear mittens and wear warm, waterproof boots that are roomy enough for an extra pair of socks and to wiggle toes. Use a neck warmer instead of a scarf. Remove wet clothing and boots immediately after playing.

· The rule of thumb for older babies and young children is to dress them in one more layer of clothing than an adult would wear in the same conditions.

· If a blanket must be used to keep a sleeping infant warm, it should be tucked in around the crib mattress, reaching only as far as the baby’s chest, so the infant’s face is less likely to become covered by bedding materials.

· Stay away from snowplows and snow blowers.

· Take extra caution when crossing roads. It might be hard for drivers to see you playing if they have snowy or frosty windows. Icy roads can also make it difficult to stop.

· Snowballs should never be aimed at people or cars. They are especially dangerous when the snow is hard-packed or icy.

· Don’t put metal objects in your mouth. Lips and tongues can freeze to the metal and cause an injury.

· Don’t eat snow, which can be dirty.

· Never sled on or near roadways. Look for shallow slopes that are free of trees, fences or any other obstacles.

· If frostbite occurs, bring the child indoors and place the frostbitten parts of her body in warm (not hot) water. 104° Fahrenheit (about the temperature of most hot tubs) is recommended. Warm washcloths may be applied to frostbitten nose, ears and lips. Do not rub the frozen areas. After a few minutes, dry and cover the child with clothing or blankets. Give him/her something warm to drink.

· If your child suffers from winter nosebleeds, try using a cold air humidifier in the child’s room at night. Saline nose drops or petrolatum may help keep nasal tissues moist.

· Children 6 months of age and up should get the influenza vaccine to reduce their risk of catching the flu.

· If you suspect your child is hypothermic, call 911 at once. Until help arrives, take the child indoors, remove any wet clothing, and wrap him in blankets or warm clothes.

Stay safe.

Source: Multiple including NIH, Healthychildren