A holistic approach to pediatric care in Frisco and Plano, Texas

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Undiagnosed Allergies

Allergies are more common than ever with almost half of the population worldwide having experienced an allergic reaction at least once in their lifetime. Up to 40 percent of children suffer from allergic rhinitis. And children are more likely to develop allergies if one or both parents have allergies. Often, we can simply misattribute an allergy symptom as an age-related change in our body, a flu or some other health condition.

Normally, allergens are harmless. But when a person has allergies, the body thinks these allergens are harmful. The body then attacks allergens with antibodies called immunoglobulin E (IgE). These antibodies are attached to special cells called mast cells. Allergens stick to the antibodies. This makes the mast cells release histamine and other chemicals causing an allergic reaction. When the chemicals irritate nearby nasal tissue, this causes nasal allergy symptoms. When this happens in the lungs’ breathing tubes, it can cause asthma symptoms such as cough and wheeze. When the reaction involves the whole body, this can be a severe allergic reaction.

sick little girl blowing nose with tissue lying in bed
Allergies in kids

Allergies can affect anyone. It doesn’t matter regardless of age, gender, race, or socioeconomic status. Generally, allergies are more common in children. But allergies can happen at any age. And they can come back after being in remission for many years. Allergies tend to happen in families. But the exact reason isn’t yet understood. Allergy symptoms often happen slowly over time.

These are some silent signs of allergies that you might mistake for something else.

1. A (Kind Of) Stuffy Nose and Sore Throat

Long-lasting sneezing, with a stuffy or runny nose, may signal the presence of allergic rhinitis—the collection of symptoms that affect the nose when you have an allergic reaction to something you breathe in and that lands on the lining inside the nose.

If you have specifically noticed asthma symptoms, such as shortness of breath, coughing, wheezing, your kid may have allergies.

2. Itchy, Irritated or Swollen Skin

Does your skin feel itchy and irritated, even though you’re moisturizing it and don’t see any rash or breakouts? Or do you wake up with a somewhat swollen face or eyelids in the morning? These signs may be a symptom of an allergy.

And though it is true that people with dry skin can also experience skin itching, especially in the winter, a constant itchiness should still be a warning sign for you. If swelling and itchiness is accompanied by other symptoms, such as headaches, a stuffed nose, or any other symptom we mention on this list, it may be caused by an allergy.

Foods, medications, supplements, fragrances, detergents, or anything else, really, can provoke these symptoms. You can be allergic to specific laundry detergents, for example, which can cause headaches, irritability, swelling and skin itching because we use it to clean our clothes, sheets and towels.

3. Experiencing Headaches, Fatigue and Irritability

Allergies can take a toll on your mental health, too, causing irritability and nervousness. It makes sense, too, if you think about it, as it is very nerve-wracking indeed to feel slightly sick, itchy and swollen without a definite idea if it’s just a new normal for you, or a cause of concern. Other related symptoms are exhaustion, mental tiredness and headaches. These two symptoms make you feel less focused and alert, too, which can really affect your productivity and life satisfaction.

4. Persisting Rash or a Recurrent Flare Up

If you experience skin rashes that flare up from time to time, possibly every season, it may indicate that you have an undiagnosed allergy. It doesn’t have to be allergic hives either, rosacea, eczema, acne and other skin conditions can all worsen due to an allergy. Also, keep in mind that allergies are often systemic, which means that a rash on your back or on the tops of your hands, for example, can be caused by a food allergy or even an allergy to cat fur, and not necessarily a product that contacted with your hands or back.

5. A Persisting Cold or Sinus Infection

A cold or sinus infection that doesn’t go away for a long time may be an allergy in disguise, especially when a treatment with antibiotics proves ineffective. This is especially true about seasonal allergies. In fact, patients with serious undiagnosed allergies often mistake them for a respiratory infection and complain to the doctor about a cold or sinusitis, when in reality they just have an allergy.

6. Sensitive or Watery Eyes

One of the most common contact allergy symptoms are uncontrollably itchy eyes, but it rarely happens that you have such a strong reaction to an allergen that your eyes immediately turn red and start itching like crazy. If you feel that your eyes become more sensitive or watery when you’re outside and it’s windy, for example, it may indicate a dust allergy. It is also often the case that some skincare or makeup products can make your eyes watery or red. As it is the case with all of these symptoms, you should observe and see if any other allergy symptoms accompany it, and if so, it may be worth a visit to a doctor.

7. Feeling Sick Only Outdoors or In a Specific Building

Are you experiencing headaches and itchiness only when you’re in school? Or, on the other hand, you feel tired and your nose is runny only when you spend time outside? It can mean that you have an allergy to a specific object found outdoors or indoors, be it pollen, mold, animals or anything else.

Allergy Triggers

Many things can trigger allergic reactions. But the most common triggers or allergens are:

  • Tree, grass, and weed pollens
  • Natural rubber latex
  • Molds
  • Dust mites
  • Animal dander, urine, and oil from skin
  • Foods
  • Medicines
  • Feathers
  • Bee stings
  • Pests such as cockroaches and mice

Allergy treatment: The 3 most effective ways to treat allergies are avoidance, allergy shots (immunotherapy), and medicine. Avoidance means staying away from something that gives you an allergic reaction.

Suggestions for staying away from allergens are:

  • Stay indoors when the pollen count is high and on windy days.
  • Control dust in the home, particularly your child’s bedroom.
  • Use air conditioning instead of opening the windows.
  • Put a dehumidifier in damp areas of the home. But remember to clean it often.
  • After playing outside when the pollen counts are high, have your child take a bath or shower, wash his or her hair, and change clothes.

Take vacations in areas where pollen is not as common, such as near the ocean.

Takeaway: If you experience a combination of the symptoms for an extended period of time, try to look for patterns and understand what product, object or animal could be triggering these symptoms. Keep a diary.

You physician or an allergologist will also help you figure out what might be causing your allergy and if it’s maybe something else, as well as be able to prescribe a suitable treatment. In the end, it is important to treat even minor allergy symptoms, as they can really affect your daily life, confidence and life satisfaction.

Source: Internet & Others

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio on Pexels.com

The views expressed in this article should not be considered as a substitute for a physician’s advice. Always make sure to seek a doctor or a professional’s advice before proceeding with the home treatment plan.


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Natural Remedy for Migraine

Headaches, including migraines, are extremely common. Because headaches can stem from a variety of causes, some headache sufferers seek treatment on a near-daily basis. Fortunately, there are several home-remedy treatments that can help alleviate migraine pain and other types of headaches.

faceless woman covering face with hands while sitting at home
Migraine sufferer

Foods that trigger Migraine

  • foods with nitrates including hot
    dogs, deli meats, bacon, and sausage
  • chocolate
  • cheese that contains the
    naturally-occurring compound tyramine, such as blue, feta, cheddar, Parmesan,
    and Swiss
  • alcohol, especially red wine
  • foods that contain monosodium
    glutamate (MSG), a flavor enhancer
  • foods that are very cold such as ice
    cream or iced drinks
  • processed foods
  • pickled foods
  • beans
  • dried fruits
  • cultured dairy products such as
    buttermilk, sour cream, and yogurt

Foods to add to your diet

Magnesium deficiency is linked to headaches and migraines. Studies show magnesium oxide supplementation helps prevent migraines with aura. It may also prevent menstrual-related migraines. You can get magnesium from foods that include:

  • almonds
  • sesame seeds
  • sunflower seeds
  • Brazil nuts
  • cashews
  • peanut butter
  • oatmeal
  • eggs
  • milk

Headache Home Remedy: Lavender Oil

Not only does lavender smell great — it’s also a useful home remedy for headaches and migraine pain. Lavender oil can be either inhaled or applied topically. Two to four drops for every two to three cups of boiling water are recommended when inhaling lavender-oil vapors as a headache treatment. Unlike many medicinal oils, this home remedy can also be safely applied externally without the need to dilute it. Lavender oil should not be taken orally.

Headache Home Remedy: Peppermint Oil

Peppermint is a soothing home remedy that has been shown to benefit tension headaches. This fresh-smelling oil has vaso-constricting and vaso-dilating properties, which help control blood flow in the body. Headaches and migraine pain are often due to poor blood flow, and peppermint oil helps to open and close the vessels that promote flow. Peppermint home remedies also open up the sinuses so that more oxygen can get into the bloodstream.

Headache Home Remedy: Basil Oil

Basil, the strong-scented herb used as a topping for pizzas and pastas, certainly tastes and smells good. And for people in need of a natural headache treatment, the oil derived from basil plants can also be a useful home remedy. Basil works as a muscle relaxant, so it is especially helpful for headaches caused by tension and tight muscles.

Headache Home Remedy: DIY Scalp Massage

Do-it-yourself scalp massages can be an effective way to alleviate migraine pain, and they feel great. Researchers in Brazil showed that massaging the greater occipital nerve — the area in the back of the head, at the base of the skull — reduces migraine pain. Massage in general has been identified as a useful home remedy for headaches, especially reflexology (massaging reflex points on the hands and feet)

Headache Home Remedy: Feverfew

Feverfew, as its name suggests, is used to treat fever, but it’s most commonly known as an herbal headache treatment. This home remedy became popular in the 1980s, when a landmark study in Great Britain showed that 70 percent of participants had less migraine pain after taking feverfew daily. Since then, more studies have demonstrated feverfew’s benefit in preventing and treating migraine pain. One study showed improvement in migraine pain among people who took daily feverfew in combination with white willow, another herbal home remedy, which contains properties similar to aspirin.

Headache Home Remedy: Ginger

Ginger is known to ease nausea caused by many conditions, including migraines. It may also have other migraine benefits. According to research , ginger powder decreased migraine severity and duration as well as the prescription drug sumatriptan, and with fewer side effects.

Headache Home Remedy: Flaxseed

Some headaches are caused by inflammation, which can be reduced by consuming omega-3 fatty acids. Flaxseed can help provide headache relief because it’s rich in omega-3s. Flaxseed can be used as a home remedy in several forms, including as an oil and ground or whole seeds

Headache Home Remedy: Buckwheat

Buckwheat’s usefulness as a home remedy for headaches and migraine pain comes from a flavonoid known as rutin. Flavonoids are phytochemicals, which are found in plants, and have been shown to contain antioxidant properties, which counteract damage to cells. In addition, researchers in Taiwan have demonstrated the effects of flavonoids on inflammation, a common cause of headaches.

Headache Home Remedy: Yoga

Yoga is thought to help improve blood flow and reduce muscle tension, which can help relieve symptoms for people who get migraines. A comprehensive research compared conventional migraine treatment with and without the addition of regular yoga practice. The researchers found that the group who participated in a yoga program had greater relief than the group who joined in conventional treatment alone.

Source: Internet, Healthline, MedNews, & Others

P Photo by Keira Burton on Pexels.com

The views expressed in this article should not be considered as a substitute for a physician’s advice. Always make sure to seek a doctor or a professional’s advice before proceeding with the home treatment plan.


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Food to improve our immune system

flat lay photography of vegetable salad on plate
Photo by Ella Olsson on Pexels.com

Our immune system’s ability to fight disease depends on the food that we consume. The immune system and white blood cells work together to deal with various infections, such as bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites, and even treat cancer cells. The normal range of white blood cells in the body is 4,300 -10,800 cells per microliter of blood.

Below you will find the recommended nutrients and foods that can be used to improve the production of white blood cells:

Vitamin C

It is very important to include different vitamins in your daily diet, but vitamin C is the most important for increasing the production of white blood cells. Foods that include citrus, chili, broccoli and green and red peppers are rich in vitamin C, making them essential to your diet. Also, it should be noted that broccoli not only helps to increase white blood cells, it also contains many antioxidants thanks to its high vitamins A and E content.

Zinc

The consumption of zinc accelerates immune system function, which is linked to increased production of white blood cells. Studies have shown that zinc deficiency may increase the risk of infection, and other studies have found evidence that zinc intake of 75 mg or more per day may reduce the duration of a cold and also the severity of the symptoms associated with it. Natural food sources include beans, sunflower seeds, chicken, nuts, whole grains, pumpkin seeds, wheat grass, and spinach.

Folic acid

Folic acid is a water-soluble vitamin that is needed to create and maintain new cells, and the consumption of this nutrient is especially important during periods of rapid cell division, such as during pregnancy or during the development and growth of infants. Vegetables such as spinach, turnips, peas, legumes and other fruits and vegetables are rich in folic acid, so it is recommended to add them to your regular weekly menu.

Selenium

The recommended daily amount of selenium for an adult is 55 micrograms, and a lack of this mineral may increase the chances of developing angina, myocardial infarction, and coronary heart disease. In addition, selenium can increase the production of white blood cells and can be found in beef, tuna, salmon, chicken, beans, and Brazil nuts.

Beta-carotene

This substance helps protect the thymus gland, which creates immune system cells. Foods that contain beta-carotene increase the production of white blood cells, and they have the ability to fight infections if you make sure to consume them daily. Daily consumption of this nutrient should range from 2 -7 mg per day and it can be found in fruits and vegetables such as carrots, tomatoes, oranges, loquat, pumpkin, mangos and dark leafy green vegetables.

Turmeric

Turmeric is a great anti-inflammatory substance that relieves both types of arthritis; Osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. In addition, the main active ingredient is curcumin, which has proven its ability to reduce inflammation and fever, thanks to its positive effect on the proper functioning of white blood cells.

Kale

Just one cup of kale will give you all the vitamin A you need a day, which can help your body fight cancer cells. Also, kale increases the production of white blood cells and helps antibodies respond to invasive infections and even neutralize them.

Garlic

Garlic contains elements that stimulate the immune system. Furthermore, it has an impressive ability to fight infections, thanks to the large concentration of allicin, created by crushing fresh garlic cloves.

Prebiotic and Probiotic

A high-fiber plant-rich diet with plenty of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and legumes appear to support the growth and maintenance of beneficial microbes. Certain helpful microbes break down fibers into short chain fatty acids, which have been shown to stimulate immune cell activity. These fibers are sometimes called prebiotics because they feed microbes. Therefore, a diet containing probiotic and prebiotic foods may be beneficial. Probiotic foods contain live helpful bacteria, and prebiotic foods contain fiber and oligosaccharides that feed and maintain healthy colonies of those bacteria.

  • Probiotic foods include kefir, yogurt with live active cultures, fermented vegetables, sauerkraut, tempeh, kombucha tea, kimchi, and miso.
  • Prebiotic foods include garlic, onions, leeks, asparagus, Jerusalem artichokes, dandelion greens, bananas, and seaweed. However, a more general rule is to eat a variety of fruits, vegetables, beans, and whole grains for dietary prebiotics.

Green tea

Cell studies have shown that tea catechins such as those found in green tea can prevent flu and some cold viruses from replicating and can increase immune activity. Human trials are still limited.

Takeaway

  1. Eat a balanced diet with whole fruits, vegetables, lean proteins, whole grains, and plenty of water.
  2. Perform moderate exercise
  3. Sleep 7-9 hours every night
  4. Manage stress
  5. Wash your hands

Source: Internet & Other sources

The views expressed in this article should not be considered as a substitute for a physician’s advice. Always make sure to seek a doctor or a professional’s advice before proceeding with the home treatment plan.

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Metallic Taste in Your Mouth!

If your mouth constantly tastes like old pennies, you’re not alone. There are actually several different conditions that may cause this to arise, some of which are far less serious than others. Below, we’ve listed some of the most common causes for a metallic taste in your mouth.

1. Over-the-counter vitamins or medicines

Multivitamins that contain heavy metals (such as zinc, copper or chromium) or certain types of cold remedies (like zinc lozenges) can cause a metallic taste to develop in your mouth. Calcium or iron supplements can cause this too, as can prenatal vitamins. The taste will often go away as your body breaks down the vitamins or medicine. If it doesn’t, check your dosage to ensure you are not taking too much. Also if you lack vitamin B-12, your nerves might not function properly, and you might develop tinnitus or a metallic taste.

2. Infections

Certain kinds of infections, such as colds, sinusitis, and upper respiratory infections can alter your sense of taste. Such sensory changes are typically temporary and will usually go away as soon as you get better.

3. Poor oral hygiene

If you don’t brush your teeth and floss regularly, then you may end up with teeth and gum problems like gingivitis, periodontitis and certain kinds of tooth infections. These usually get better with a prescription from your dentist, with any metallic tastes leaving along with them.

4. Prescription drugs

These medicines include the gout medicine allopurinol, antibiotics such as tetracycline, lithium, used in the treatment of certain psychiatric conditions, and particular cardiac drugs. Certain drugs which cause your mouth to go dry may also be the cause, since they may be absorbed close to your taste buds.

5. Dementia

Persons with dementia often experience taste abnormalities. This is because there is a connection between the taste buds and the brain. As a result, taste abnormalities often arise when the part of the brain related to taste is not functioning properly.

6. Chemical exposure

If you find that you have been exposed to lead or mercury, such as through accidental inhalation, then you may find that you have a metallic taste in your mouth, which should be seen to by a professional.

7. Cancer treatment

A metallic taste in your mouth may also arise if you are being treated for cancer via radiation therapy or chemotherapy. This is a normal side effect and should not be anything to worry about.

8. Pregnancy

During some of the earliest stages of pregnancy, some expectant mothers find that their sense of taste has been altered drastically. One of those changes may be a metallic taste in the mouth. Consult your doctor if it is causing you any distress.

9. Hay Fever or allergic rhinitis

Hay fever can leave a metallic taste in your mouth due to inflamed nasal passages that disrupt your ability to taste.

10. Covid-19

COVID-19 is an illness caused by a strand of coronavirus discovered in late 2019. COVID-19 can cause a wide range of flu-like symptoms 2 to 14 days after exposure.

11. Pine nut syndrome

Pine nut syndrome is a rare reaction to pine nuts that begins 12 to 48 hours after eating them. It causes a bitter metallic taste in your mouth that can last up to a month.

Treating the underlying cause

  • Allergies are usually treated by making lifestyle changes to reduce contact with dust, mold, and other allergens. Non-drowsy antihistamines are available over the counter to help you manage your symptoms.
  • If you have a viral infection, such as a sinus infection or COVID-19, it’s important to stay hydrated and get plenty of rest to allow your body to recuperate. Nasal decongestants may help you improve your breathing. Ibuprofen and other anti-inflammatories may help with body aches and pains.
  • If you’re experiencing shortness of breath, a fever over 103 degrees, or pressure in your chest, you should seek medical attention.
  • If your medication is causing your symptoms, a doctor may recommend changing your dose or the medication.

Source: Internet & Other sources

The views expressed in this article should not be considered as a substitute for a physician’s advice. Always make sure to seek a doctor or a professional’s advice before proceeding with the home treatment plan.


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NATURAL WAYS TO FIGHT MALARIA, DENGUE FEVER AND CHIKUNGUNYA

Neem oil: Neem has a number of great benefits for the human body, but apart from being an elixir for your health, neem is also a great mosquito-repellent. A study published in the Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association found that mixing neem oil with coconut oil in a 1:1 ratio is a really effective way to keep mosquitoes at bay. Being a potent antibacterial, anti-fungal, antiviral and anti-protozoal agent, neem lends your skin a particular smell that wards off mosquitoes. To make an effective insecticide mix neem oil and coconut oil in equal portions and rub it on your body (all exposed parts). This will protect you from mosquito bites for at least eight hours.

Eucalyptus and lemon oil: Recommended by the CDC (Center for Disease Control) as an effective insect-repellent the mixture of lemon oil and eucalyptus oil is extremely effective in repelling mosquitoes – naturally. The way lemon oil and eucalyptus oil works is due to its active component cineole, which has both antiseptic and insect-repellent properties when applied to the skin. The best part about this mixture is that it is natural and does not come with all the ill effects of chemical mosquito repellents. To use this mixture, mix lemon oil and eucalyptus oil in equal proportions and use it on your body. (Read:Neem and tulsi, effective remedies to keep malaria out of your home)

Camphor: Using camphor as a repellent also works wonders. Made from the extract of a tree, this compound has been found to have the longest mosquito repellent activity when compared to other natural products. Light camphor in a room and close all the doors and windows. Leave it this way for about fifteen to twenty minutes and go back to a mosquito free environment.

Tulsi: According to data published in the Parasitology Research Journal tulsi was extremely effective in killing mosquito larvae and helped keep mosquitoes away. Moreover, according Ayurveda simply planting a tulsi shrub near your window is all you need to keep mosquitoes away. The plant has properties that do not allow mosquitoes to breed and will prevent them from entering your house.

Garlic: Is a great way to keep mosquitoes at bay. It might smell bad, but that is exactly why mosquitoes stay away. The strong and pungent odour of garlic is known to prevent mosquito bites and even prevents them from entering your home. So to use this remedy you could crush up a few pods of garlic, boil it in water and use the water to spray around the room you want to keep mosquito free. If you are the adventurous type (or really hate mosquitoes), you could also spray it on yourself to avoid being bitten.

Tea tree oil: It has numerous benefits for your skin and hair and is a very powerful antibacterial and antifungal agent as well, but did you know that tea tree oil is also perfect to drive mosquitoes away? Well, the odour and its antifungal and antibacterial properties help prevent mosquitoes from biting you and drive them away. So if you want to use this remedy you could either rub some tea tree oil on your skin or add a few drops of it to a vaporizer. This way the scent of tea tree oil permeates the air keeping mosquitoes at bay.

Mint : If the scent of mint relaxes you then this remedy is for you. According to a study published in the Journal of Bioresource Technology {4} found that mint oil and mint extract is as effective as any other insect repellent. You can use mint leaves and essence in a number of ways. You can choose to use it in a vaporizer to help fill the room with the scent of mint, apply the oil on your body or plant the shrub outside your rooms window. Alternatively you could mix a bit of mint-flavored mouthwash with water and spray it around your home.

Lavender: Not only does it smell absolutely divine but it is also a great way to keep those pesky mosquitoes at bay. The scent of this flower is often quite strong for mosquitoes making them unable to bite. So to use this home remedy, use lavender oil as a natural room freshener or apply it on your skin (you can mix it with your cream) for best results.


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NEWS: FOOD BORNE ILLNESS

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service joined forces to create the Interagency Food Safety Analytics Collaboration and issue the report. The study used data from nearly 1,000 outbreaks that occurred from 1998 to 2012. Among its key findings, it broke down which types of food are most likely to harbor common types of bacteria:

E. coli: More than 80 percent of cases were a result of eating beef and row crops such as leafy green vegetables.

Salmonella: Though this type of bacteria can end up in a large variety of foods, 77 percent of cases were related to eggs, chicken, beef, bean sprouts, pork and seeded fruits and vegetables such as melons and tomatoes.

Campylobacter: Dairy is the primary culprit for infections caused by this type of bacteria, with 66 percent coming from raw milk and cheeses such as unpasteurized queso fresco. Chicken accounted for 8 percent of campylobacter infections.

Listeria: Though there was less data on this type of bacteria, the report finds fruits such as cantaloupe accounted for about half of all listeria infections; dairy was to blame in about 31 percent of cases.


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RESEARCH NEWS: CARAMEL COLOR IS A CARCINOGEN

STUDY FINDINGS:

A new study has revealed that presence of carcinogens in the caramel color added to cold drinks increases the risk of cancer among people with high consumption. The chemical, 4-methylimidazole (4-MEI), is produced as a byproduct when caramel color is formed in soft drinks. Findings of the study have been published in the journal PLOS ONE. The chemical is also found in roasted foods, grilled meats or coffee.

Read more:

FOOD FAKES – DID YOU KNOW?

DANGERS OF FOOD COLOR ADDITIVES


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WINTRY WEATHER – HOW TO PROTECT YOUR CHILD

This is Accuweather’s prediction for this weekend.

It sounds brutal. Let’s avoid falling sick. Know that.

· Young children generate less body heat, and get cold more quickly than adults.

· It is better to dress your child in layers of clothing that can be put on and taken off easily.

· Infants being pulled in a sled need extra bundling. Because they aren’t moving, they can’t generate body heat the way a playing child can.

TIPS TO MANAGE KIDS IN WINTER

· Children shouldn’t play outside alone. Establish a buddy system. Better yet, avoid outdoors. Never send children outside in extreme weather conditions such as snowstorms.

· Check often to see that your child is warm and dry. Younger children should take regular breaks and come inside for a warm drink.

· If your child’s feet and hands are warm, what they are wearing is usually good. Dress your child in layers of clothing that can be put on and taken off easily. Wear a hat because a lot of body heat is lost through the head. Keep ears covered at all times. Wear mittens and wear warm, waterproof boots that are roomy enough for an extra pair of socks and to wiggle toes. Use a neck warmer instead of a scarf. Remove wet clothing and boots immediately after playing.

· The rule of thumb for older babies and young children is to dress them in one more layer of clothing than an adult would wear in the same conditions.

· If a blanket must be used to keep a sleeping infant warm, it should be tucked in around the crib mattress, reaching only as far as the baby’s chest, so the infant’s face is less likely to become covered by bedding materials.

· Stay away from snowplows and snow blowers.

· Take extra caution when crossing roads. It might be hard for drivers to see you playing if they have snowy or frosty windows. Icy roads can also make it difficult to stop.

· Snowballs should never be aimed at people or cars. They are especially dangerous when the snow is hard-packed or icy.

· Don’t put metal objects in your mouth. Lips and tongues can freeze to the metal and cause an injury.

· Don’t eat snow, which can be dirty.

· Never sled on or near roadways. Look for shallow slopes that are free of trees, fences or any other obstacles.

· If frostbite occurs, bring the child indoors and place the frostbitten parts of her body in warm (not hot) water. 104° Fahrenheit (about the temperature of most hot tubs) is recommended. Warm washcloths may be applied to frostbitten nose, ears and lips. Do not rub the frozen areas. After a few minutes, dry and cover the child with clothing or blankets. Give him/her something warm to drink.

· If your child suffers from winter nosebleeds, try using a cold air humidifier in the child’s room at night. Saline nose drops or petrolatum may help keep nasal tissues moist.

· Children 6 months of age and up should get the influenza vaccine to reduce their risk of catching the flu.

· If you suspect your child is hypothermic, call 911 at once. Until help arrives, take the child indoors, remove any wet clothing, and wrap him in blankets or warm clothes.

Stay safe.

Source: Multiple including NIH, Healthychildren


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ACCUPRESSURE POINTS

PRESS the points of problem in your hand or feet to relieve your issue.

The Hands

1. Sinusitis 12. Eye Diseases 23. Joints 34. Appendix 45. Weight loss
2. Headache 13. Ear diseases 24. Small intestine 35. Hemorrhoids 46. Diaphragm
3. Anxiety 14. Shoulder pain 25. Hypertension 36. Pain 47. A lump in the thyroid gland
4. Depression 15. Lung disease 26. Spleen Diseases 37. Fertility Problems 48. Parathyroid pain
5. Insomnia 16. Diarrhea (dysentery) 27. Indigestion 38. Sexual arousal 49. Cervical pain
6. Cooling 17. Diseases of the stomach 28. Large intestine 39. Womb 50. Back pain
7. Energy stimulation 18. Liver disease 29. Loss of appetite 40. Prostate 51. Spinal pain
8. Stress 19. Menstrual cramps 30. Intestinal diseases 41. Problems with ejaculation 52. Back pain
9. Stimulation Memory 20. Heart 31. Upset stomach 42. Testicular pain
10. Eye veins 21. Diabetes 32. Bladder infection 43. Almond pain
11. Ear veins 22. Kidney disease 33. Urinary Incontinence 44. Hormone deficiency

The Feet

1. Sinusitis 11. Diseases of the ear 20. Diabetes 29. Pain 38. Shoulder Pain
2. Headaches 12. Toothache 21. Kidney disease 30. Infertility 39. Almond pain
3. Anxiety 13. Lung disease 22. Small intestine 31. Sexual stimulation 40. Hormone deficiency
4. Passing out 14. Heart disease 23. Digestive disorders 32. Joint pain 41. Weight loss
5. Insomnia 15. Diseases of blood flow 24. Large intestine 33. Leg pain 42. Thyroid nodules
6. Stimulate Memory 16. Hypertension 25. Bulimia 34. Heel pain 43. Parathyroid pain
7. Cooling 17. Diseases of the stomach 26. Intestinal obstruction 35. Hemorrhoids
8. Ear specialist 18. Diseases of the spleen 27. Appendix 36. Back pain
10. Vision problems 19. Liver disease 28. Bladder 37. Lower back pain


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LATEST RESEARCH NOTE ON ADHD

STUDY: A study published in PLoS One by researchers at Columbia University’s Center for Children’s Environmental Health found that children exposed to high levels of air pollution during pregnancy were five times more likely to have ADHD by age 9.

DETAILS: The researchers measured levels of a common pollutant called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons or PAHs. PAHs are a group of chemicals that are used in making dyes, plastics, pesticides and even medicines and in modern life they are pretty much unavoidable. The EPA has classified seven PAH compounds as probable human carcinogens: benzanthracene, benzopyrene, benzo fluoranthene, benzo fluoranthene, chrysene, dibenzanthracene, and indenopyrene.

The Center for Children’s Environmental Health reports studies that demonstrate that exposure to PAH pollution during pregnancy is related to adverse birth outcomes including low birth weight, premature delivery, and heart malformations. Also higher levels of PAH is associated with a 24% higher score of anxiety or depression for children ages six to seven than those with low exposure levels.

Suggestions:

a) Avoid regions with high air pollution

b) Some studies suggest that children with ADHD may have lower levels of zinc in their body. And some scientists have reported improved symptoms in children with ADHD who took zinc supplements along with traditional ADHD treatment.

c) There is some evidence that fish oil with high Omega-3 can help improve ADHD symptoms.

d) Scientific research on ADHD diets is limited and results are mixed. Some believe that including beans, cheese, eggs, meat, and nuts is good. Add protein foods in the morning and for after-school snacks, to improve concentration and possibly increase the time ADHD medications work. Include vegetables and some fruits (including oranges, tangerines, pears, grapefruit, apples, and kiwi).

Source: PLOS, Wikipedia, WebMD others


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COMMON COLD SEASON (WHAT DO YOU DO)

WHAT IS A COMMON COLD?

The common cold is transmitted from person to person, usually by touching a person who has a cold, or touching something that that person has touched (like a door) — and then touching your mouth or eye. Colds can occur at any time of year, but are more common during the winter months. The average child has 6 colds a year, although children in daycare or

preschool can have them more frequently.

SYMPTOMS

Typically symptoms of a cold are runny nose, sneezing, mild sore throat, cough and a slight fever. Most colds last between one and two weeks, and progress from watery runny nose and possibly a mild sore throat to thicker mucus and congestion with cough.

PREVENTION

The most important thing about colds is PREVENTION. Wash your hands after being outside of your home, and tell your children to do the same. Making sure that children get enough sleep and eat well also helps to prevent colds. For young babies (less than 2 months) try to avoid contact with people who have colds, and try to avoid crowds and gatherings where someone almost certainly has a cold.

TREATMENT

There is no “cure” for a cold. Our bodies fight off the cold without any need for medicines, and we cannot make them go away any faster with medicines. Antibiotics (like Amoxicillin) do not help colds. The only thing we can do for children is to make them as comfortable as possible and wait for the symptoms to go away.

HOME TREATMENT

Although many people use medicines to make their children feel better when they have a cold, there are several things that you can do for your child AT HOME that may be better than giving medicine:

1) Have your child drink lots of fluids. Many children lost their appetite with a cold, and may drink less as well. By encouraging them to drink more, you will help make the mucus thinner, and make them more comfortable.

2) Use saline drops and a bulb syringe, or a saline nose spray to remove the mucus. See the instruction sheet available in the pharmacy for how to prepare the saline and use the bulb syringe.

3) Humidifier. If you have one, then a humidifier may help to keep the nose, mouth and throat moist, making your child more comfortable.

4) Use some Vaseline (petroleum jelly) around your child’s nose to help prevent it becoming sore.

5) Try and have your child get extra rest. It is not necessary to restrict their activities or keep them home from school or daycare, but slowing them down a little may help them to feel better.

6) Remember that fever is not all bad. Fever may help to fight the cold.

WHEN TO CALL YOUR DOCTOR:

  • · Your child has any difficulty breathing or is breathing fast.
  • · Your child develops a fever that lasts for more than 3 days.
  • · Your child has nasal discharge lasting greater than 14 days
  • · Your child develops an earache.
  • · Your child has chills or rigors.
  • · Your child has eye discharge.
  • · Your child’s cough becomes worse, or barky.
  • · Your child’s cough persists for more than 2 weeks.
  • · Your child develops a headache or stiff neck.
  • · Your child develops a sore throat that lasts for more than 48 hours.
  • · Your child is less than 2 months old and has any temperature elevation.
  • · Your child is less than 2 years old and is not drinking fluids.
  • · Your child seems more sick than with a regular cold, or you are worried.

Source: Ethnomed