A holistic approach to pediatric care in Frisco and Plano, Texas

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NATURAL WAYS TO FIGHT MALARIA, DENGUE FEVER AND CHIKUNGUNYA

Neem oil: Neem has a number of great benefits for the human body, but apart from being an elixir for your health, neem is also a great mosquito-repellent. A study published in the Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association found that mixing neem oil with coconut oil in a 1:1 ratio is a really effective way to keep mosquitoes at bay. Being a potent antibacterial, anti-fungal, antiviral and anti-protozoal agent, neem lends your skin a particular smell that wards off mosquitoes. To make an effective insecticide mix neem oil and coconut oil in equal portions and rub it on your body (all exposed parts). This will protect you from mosquito bites for at least eight hours.

Eucalyptus and lemon oil: Recommended by the CDC (Center for Disease Control) as an effective insect-repellent the mixture of lemon oil and eucalyptus oil is extremely effective in repelling mosquitoes – naturally. The way lemon oil and eucalyptus oil works is due to its active component cineole, which has both antiseptic and insect-repellent properties when applied to the skin. The best part about this mixture is that it is natural and does not come with all the ill effects of chemical mosquito repellents. To use this mixture, mix lemon oil and eucalyptus oil in equal proportions and use it on your body. (Read:Neem and tulsi, effective remedies to keep malaria out of your home)

Camphor: Using camphor as a repellent also works wonders. Made from the extract of a tree, this compound has been found to have the longest mosquito repellent activity when compared to other natural products. Light camphor in a room and close all the doors and windows. Leave it this way for about fifteen to twenty minutes and go back to a mosquito free environment.

Tulsi: According to data published in the Parasitology Research Journal tulsi was extremely effective in killing mosquito larvae and helped keep mosquitoes away. Moreover, according Ayurveda simply planting a tulsi shrub near your window is all you need to keep mosquitoes away. The plant has properties that do not allow mosquitoes to breed and will prevent them from entering your house.

Garlic: Is a great way to keep mosquitoes at bay. It might smell bad, but that is exactly why mosquitoes stay away. The strong and pungent odour of garlic is known to prevent mosquito bites and even prevents them from entering your home. So to use this remedy you could crush up a few pods of garlic, boil it in water and use the water to spray around the room you want to keep mosquito free. If you are the adventurous type (or really hate mosquitoes), you could also spray it on yourself to avoid being bitten.

Tea tree oil: It has numerous benefits for your skin and hair and is a very powerful antibacterial and antifungal agent as well, but did you know that tea tree oil is also perfect to drive mosquitoes away? Well, the odour and its antifungal and antibacterial properties help prevent mosquitoes from biting you and drive them away. So if you want to use this remedy you could either rub some tea tree oil on your skin or add a few drops of it to a vaporizer. This way the scent of tea tree oil permeates the air keeping mosquitoes at bay.

Mint : If the scent of mint relaxes you then this remedy is for you. According to a study published in the Journal of Bioresource Technology {4} found that mint oil and mint extract is as effective as any other insect repellent. You can use mint leaves and essence in a number of ways. You can choose to use it in a vaporizer to help fill the room with the scent of mint, apply the oil on your body or plant the shrub outside your rooms window. Alternatively you could mix a bit of mint-flavored mouthwash with water and spray it around your home.

Lavender: Not only does it smell absolutely divine but it is also a great way to keep those pesky mosquitoes at bay. The scent of this flower is often quite strong for mosquitoes making them unable to bite. So to use this home remedy, use lavender oil as a natural room freshener or apply it on your skin (you can mix it with your cream) for best results.


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NEWS: FOOD BORNE ILLNESS

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service joined forces to create the Interagency Food Safety Analytics Collaboration and issue the report. The study used data from nearly 1,000 outbreaks that occurred from 1998 to 2012. Among its key findings, it broke down which types of food are most likely to harbor common types of bacteria:

E. coli: More than 80 percent of cases were a result of eating beef and row crops such as leafy green vegetables.

Salmonella: Though this type of bacteria can end up in a large variety of foods, 77 percent of cases were related to eggs, chicken, beef, bean sprouts, pork and seeded fruits and vegetables such as melons and tomatoes.

Campylobacter: Dairy is the primary culprit for infections caused by this type of bacteria, with 66 percent coming from raw milk and cheeses such as unpasteurized queso fresco. Chicken accounted for 8 percent of campylobacter infections.

Listeria: Though there was less data on this type of bacteria, the report finds fruits such as cantaloupe accounted for about half of all listeria infections; dairy was to blame in about 31 percent of cases.


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TREATING VOMITING AND DIARRHEA

WHAT CAUSES VOMITING AND DIARRHEA?

Vomiting and diarrhea in children is usually passed to others by direct contact with stool or by food contaminated with stool. This type of illness almost always gets better without medicine.

Parents just need to make sure that children are not becoming dehydrated.

Vomiting and diarrhea in the United States is usually much milder and less dangerous than it is in countries where food and water may not be as clean. In other countries, illnesses like Cholera

are common and can be very dangerous. Cholera is very rare in the United States.

Even more rarely, vomiting and diarrhea can be due to some kind of blockage in the intestines, like appendicitis. Children with this type of illness have pain in the abdomen that continues or

worsens, and their vomit usually turns green. Children with this type of illness get worse with time instead of getting better. If this is the case, call your doctor immediately.

HOME TREATMENT – (< 2 YEARS)

  • · Continue Breast feeding if the child is breast-fed. If the child seems dehydrated feed a Oral Rehydration Solution like Pedialyte.
  • · Give adequate fluids. Even if baby continues to vomit, keep feeding.
  • · Do not use sodas or sports drink or fruit juice. They have too much sugar and not much salt.

HOME TREATMENT – (OLDER THAN 2 YEARS)

  • · For all children, wait 15 to 30 minutes after vomiting before trying the next feeding. When giving Oral Rehydration Solution, give small amounts frequently. If you let them drink a large amount at one time, they will probably vomit.
  • · Do not give your child plan water to drink. Children who are vomiting needs sugars and salts as well as water.
  • · Once your child has stopped vomiting for at least a few hours, you can reintroduce other liquids and solid foods.
  • · Do not use Oral Rehydration Solution as the only fluid for more than 24 hours; add solids and other liquids.
  • · If your child has only diarrhea, do not withhold solid food, formula or breast milk. Certain foods help make stools firmer. These foods are often called the BRAT diet: Banana, Rice, Applesauce and Toast. Other foods may make diarrhea worse: these include raw fruits and vegetables, beans and some spices. For children in diapers, try protecting the skin with an ointment like Vitamin A&D ointment.

ORAL REHYDRATION SOLUTION

Oral rehydration solution can be purchased from any pharmacy or supermarket (common brands are Infalyte® and Pedialyte®), or made at home.

TO MAKE AT HOME

  • · 1 quart (32 ounces) or 1 liter clean water
  • · 1/2 teaspoon (small spoon) salt
  • · 2 tablespoons (big spoon) sugar
  • · Mix well. DO NOT HEAT OR BOIL

Many children will drink this solution without flavorings.

WHEN TO CALL YOUR DOCTOR:

  • · Your child has had no urine in 8 hours, or less than 3 in 24 hours.
  • · Your child has dry mouth and lips, or does not have tears with crying.
  • · Your child is difficult to wake up.
  • · Your child is consistently refusing to drink liquids.
  • · Your child develops a fever greater than 102ºF (38.9º C) with vomiting and diarrhea.
  • · Your child has been vomiting for more than 24 hours, or has vomited more than 3 times in the past 8 hours.
  • · Your child’s vomit turns green, bloody, or contains what look like coffee grounds.
  • · There is any chance that your child accidentally ate or swallowed anything poisonous, including medicines.
  • · Your child has had a recent injury to the head or abdomen.
  • · Your child is less than 2 years old and has had diarrhea for more than 24 hours.
  • · Your child is older than 2 years old and has had diarrhea for more than 48 hours.
  • · Your child has had more than 6 stools in 8 hours.
  • · Your child has any blood or mucus in the stool.
  • · Your child has constant abdominal pain for more than 2 hours.
  • · Your child is on antibiotics.
  • · Your child seems to be getting sicker, or you are worried.

Source: Ethnomed


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DANGEROUS CHILD HEALTH MYTHS

MYTHS

Myth: Swimming less than an hour after eating is dangerous.

One study that examined all drownings in the United States found that fewer than one percent of all drownings occur within an hour after the person ate a meal. Much more dangerous, however, is swimming after consuming an alcoholic beverage. According to the CDC, alcohol use and intoxication is associated with up to half of all adolescent and adult deaths that occur while swimming recreationally.

Myth: Sunburns will “fade to a tan.

Sunburns and suntans are completely different. A sunburn means that the tissue in the skin has been overexposed to UV light, causing burning and inflammation. A suntan, on the other hand, is a result of moderate UV exposure, which causes skin cells called melanocytes to release a pigment called melanin. Melanin is a darker pigment that absorbs UV light, protecting the skin from UV damage.

Myth: People with darker skin do not need to use sunscreen.

People with naturally darker skin have more melanin in their skin, so their skin is more prone to absorb damaging UV rays, protecting them from sunburns. However, it is still possible for darker-skinned people to get sunburned when overexposed to the sun.

Myth: Salty sea water is good for cleaning cuts and other wounds.

home-made salt water is good for disinfecting cuts, sea water contains many germs and impurities that can actually cause harm if they enter the body through an open wound or sore. Tropical waters can also host some harsh bacteria, because warmer water encourages bacteria to grow.

Myth: Any type of cooking has the same effect/benefit

Steaming is one of the best ways to capitalize on a vegetable’s taste, color, and most importantly, its nutrients. Vegetables lose nutrients in the water they are cooked in. Healthful (and flavor-conscious!) chefs often save the water (in which vegetables is boiled) to make savory soups and other palatable recipes that require vegetable stock to regain some of the nutrients lost.

Myth: Small doses of adult medicines are safe for children.

Beware: Babies and kids are NOT small adults. Their body metabolizes drugs differently.

Myth: Teething can cause fevers in babies

Fever in a teething baby shouldn’t be written off and medical attention should be sought

Myth: Certain videos can help babies learn sooner

AAP says that the educational merit of media for children younger than 2 years remains unproven

Myth: Walkers are a safe way to help babies walk earlier

Remember, a baby in a walker can quickly and unexpectedly approach a staircase

Myth: Crib bumpers are a safe way to protect babies’ heads while they sleep

Risk of suffocation or sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) from crib bumpers is high enough that the AAP recommends all soft bedding, including bumpers, be removed from an infant’s crib.

Myth: Use breast milk to treat an ear infection

Breast milk does have some antibodies in it. But it also has lots of sugars in it that bacteria love to grow on.

Myth: Babies need water when it’s hot

Not true. Babies, like children and adults, need to stay hydrated. Use Electrolytes.

For more such tips, check out our Facebook page: www.facebook.com/naturalpediatrics


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TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Part 5

(DISCLAIMER: This is NOT a medical advice nor does it substitute for one. These are home remedies that has worked for us. Please consult your child’s doctor before you try them at your own risk.)

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: NOSE BLEED

1) Set upright and lean forward

2) Pinch your nose and breath through your mouth

3) Avoid hard blowing of nose

4) To prevent, increase humidity with a Humidifier or OTC saline spray

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Pink Eye

1) Use a warm moist compress over closed eyes multiple times. If allergy sis the reason, use a cool compress

2) Wash hands to avoid spreading.

3) Avoid cosmetics and contacts

4) See doctor to see if it is bacterial or allergic pink eye

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Poison Ivy

1) Wash immediately every where and all clothes

2) Do not scratch. Use OTC calamine lotion or hydrocortisone

3) Use oatmeal bath and cool water bath

4) Cover open blister with gauze

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Stomach flu

1) Eat less and sample ice chips or drink electrolyte. Avoid apple juice and instead try Pedialyte

2) Gradually get back to regular food. Avoid fatty or spicy food. Use simple starch like rice, cracker, banana

3) Take rest and avoid pain killers.

4) Check out with doctor to see if it could be food poisoning

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Sun burn

1) Apply cool moist compress

2) Use moisturizers. Avoid any –caine OTC drugs. Instead use aloe vera or 1% hydrocortisone. Try non-aspirin anti-inflamatory medicines

3) Rehydrate

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Body odor for teens

1) Take bath daily and use natural fiber clothes

2) Dry your feet . Use athletic socks

3) Use perfume free deodorant (not antiperspirant)

4) Try changing diet

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Swimmers ears for older kids, (not infant)

1) Home remedy – mix 1 part white vinegar and 1 part rubbing alcohol and apply 1 tsp and drain before and after swim to prevent bacteria and fungus growth

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Teething for babies

1) Massage baby’s gums

2) Use teething toys

3) Use cool wash cloth dry drools

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Tick bite

1) Wear long sleeve shirt and pants. Keep yard clear of brush and leaves. Use insect repellant.

2) If bitten, remove tick using tweezer over the tick’s head. Wash the area after

3) See doctor to rule out other diseases like Lyme, rocky mountain spotted fever etc.


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TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Part 4

(DISCLAIMER: This is NOT a medical advice nor does it substitute for one. These are home remedies that has worked for us. Please consult your child’s doctor before you try them at your own risk.)

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Ear Infection

1) Start with an OTC pain killer

2) Moist warm compress over ears helps

3) Cuddle and distract baby

4) Most ear infection resolve without an antibiotic but if it is recurrent or kid is <2ys you may need it

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Eczema or Dry skin

1) Try to find the irritant that triggers it (like cloth, soap, detergent etc)

2) Apply calamine lotion or 1% hydrocortisone

3) Avoid itching with a bandage

4) Use a cool moist compress

5) Take an colloidal oatmeal + baking soda bath.

6) Moisturize the skin (after bath) with strong OTC creams like Eucerin, Neutragena or baby oil

7) Avoid non-moisturizing soap

8) Use a humidifier

9) Use a humidifier

10) Use cotton or silk clothes (no wool or acrylic)

11) I have seen some use ½ cup bleach in a bathtub full of water. Soaking in it apparently kills the bacteria on skin. Use this only for older kids

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Eye Sty

1) Leave it alone and don’t pop it

2) Apply warm compress as many times as possible

3) To prevent, avoid old cosmetics, thoroughly cleaning any contact lens and washing hands

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Flu

1) Drink lots of electrolytes

2) Take rest and use non-aspirin pain medicines

3) To prevent, get whole family vaccinated

4) Wash hands or use the hand-gel

5) Eat lots of immune building veggies and fruits

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Headache (for older kids only)

1) For tension head ache, try massage, shower, relaxation, low dose pain killer, some exercise

2) Eucalyptus or peppermint oil helps ease pain

3) For migraine, try going to sleep in a dark room, meditation, relaxing music or yoga

4) Promising research is being done on herbs like feverfew and butterbur, high dose B-2, magnesium supplements and Coenzyme Q10

5) Some older kids coffee caffeine may help

6) For frequent headache, keep track of triggers and avoid it

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Hives

1) Record and identify trigger – like food, medicine, pollen, pet, insect sting or latex

2) Use OTC antihistamine to minimize itching

3) Use a cool moist compress and bandage to cover

4) Take a cool bath and wear soft natural fiber clothes

5) Try oatmeal bath

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Indigestion (for older kids, not infant)

1) Eat less and chew your food

2) Eat more easily digestible food like fruits and veggies. Avoid soda, spicy or fatty food

3) Exercise

4) Drink peppermint tea

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Jammed finger (for older kids, not infant)

1) Use ice pack

2) Keep your hand elevated

3) Use a buddy tape over injured and adjacent finger

4) If pain doesn’t subside, check out if finger is broken/cracked or bent

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Nausea/Vomiting in infants

1) In babies a little spit is not vomiting. Vomit is forceful. So give baby’s stomach a rest,

2) Give small sips to avoid dehydration

3) Try oral electrolyte


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TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Part 3

(DISCLAIMER: This is NOT a medical advice nor does it substitute for one. These are home remedies that has worked for us. Please consult your child’s doctor before you try them at your own risk.)

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: COUGH

1) Drink plenty of fluid (AVOID sodas)

2) Use a humidifier

3) Try lozenges for bigger kids

4) Honey or turmeric in warm milk helps the throat

5) Elevate head with more pillows

6) Avoid cough syrups

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Croup

1) Cuddle or distract child

2) Use cool-mist humidifier

3) Hold kid in upright position

4) Give fluids and plenty of rest

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Dandruff

1) Use anti-dandruff organic shampoo

2) If severe try medicated shampoo

3) Avoid any chemicals on hair

4) Expose head to sunlight

5) Try tea tree oil. Tea tree oil is antiseptic, antibiotic, & antifungal.

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Diaper rash

1) Change diaper frequently

2) Use warm water to clean (AVOID wipes)

3) Try zinc oxide

4) Keep it aerated/open without diaper for a while

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Diarrhea

1) Drink clear liquids (not fruit juices)

2) Add semi solid or low fiber food (like cracker, egg, rice)

3) Avoid dairy products, caffeine

4) Try probiotic yogurt or soy drinks

5) Be very careful when it is infants

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Dry eyes

1) Blink often

2) Avoid rubbing eyes

3) Try OTC artificial tears

4) Use a humidifier

5) Wear glasses to avoid wind

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Dry Skin

1) Keep baths to 15 min or less

2) Moisturize the skin (after bath) with strong OTC creams like Eucerin, Neutragena or baby oil

3) Avoid non-moisturizing soap

4) Use a humidifier

5) Use cotton or silk clothes

6) Avoid itching (may use 1% Hydrocortisone)


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TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Part 2

(DISCLAIMER: This is NOT a medical advice nor does it substitute for one. These are home remedies that has worked for us. Please consult your child’s doctor before you try them at your own risk.)

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: BRONCHITIS IN OLDER KIDS

1) Avoid 2nd hand smoke and exposure to irritants like paints/cleaners

2) Use a humidifier

3) Consider face mask for outside cold air

4) Try a different breathing method – take a deep breath, then slowly breath out through mouth (in kissing pose). Repeat. This develops lungs.

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: BRUISE

1) Elevate injured area

2) Apply cold pack/compress

3) Rest

4) Use OTC painkillers

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: BURNS

1) Immerse in cool water (NOT ice)

2) Use burn gel

3) Use a sterile gauze bandage

4) Take OTC painkiller

5) Don’t break blister

6) Watch for infection

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Ulcer in mouth/Canker sore

1) Apply ice

2) Rinse with salt water

3) Brush gently

4) Try milk of magnesia

5) Use OTC oragel or anbesol

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Colic

1) Try feeding the baby or giving pacifier

2) Cuddle

3) Gently rock or take a car drive

4) Use white noise in background

5) Softly massage the tummy area

6) Consider dietary/formula changes

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Common cold

1) Drink lot of fluid

2) Try chicken soup

3) Use a cool mist humidifier

4) Gargle with warm salt water

5) Use nasal saline drops & bulb suction of nose

6) Get vitamin C or Zinc

7) Get rest

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Constipation

1) Eat more veggies and fruits (especially fibrous prunes, beans, fig etc)

2) Dink lots of water

3) Increase physical activity

4) Try warm bath for small kids and stimulation to anal area

5) Avoid non fibrous food like cheese, milk and meats or processed food


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TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Part 1

(DISCLAIMER: This is NOT a medical advice nor does it substitute for one. These are home remedies that has worked for us. Please consult your child’s doctor before you try them at your own risk.)

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: ACNE IN TEENS

1) Avoid greasy or oily cosmetics

2) Keep your face clean (including hair)

3) Get enough sleep to reduce stress

4) Don’t pick on blemishes

5) Use 5% Tea tree oil gel (has same effect as Benzoyl Peroxide) but NOT if you have Acne Rosacea

6) Zinc supplements helps wound healing

7) Naturally occurring glycolic acid (in sugar cane) helps unclog pores

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: AIRPLANE EARS

1) For infant or young kids – give fluid or pacifier during takeoff and landing. Don’t give decongestants.

2) Look for specially design earplugs that slowly equalize pressure

3) For kids – suck candy or chew gum which helps open the Eustachian tube.

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: SPRING or FALL ALLERGIES

1) Rise out your sinuses

2) Wash immediately after you come inside

3) Keep windows and doors closed in allergy season

4) Use HEPA filter.

5) Use allergen/dust blocking pillow and mattress

6) Keep indoor humidity between 30-50%

7) Wash or change air filters often

8) Avoid pets with fur/feather

9) Bath pets frequently

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: ASTHMA

1) Keep a dairy and avoid allergens that might cause symptoms (e.g. pets, particular food)

2) Clean the auto and home air filters in A/C or heater

3) Clean home and bed weekly

4) Avoid 2nd hand smoke

5) Exercise moderately (not heavy)

6) Maintain your child’s weight

7) Control the heartburn. Reflux is known to cause breathing issues.

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: BED WETTING IN OLDER KIDS

1) Don’t worry. Most kids will outgrow it.

2) Limit your child ‘s fluid intake in the evening

3) Treat constipation if any

4) Initially wake them up once in the middle of the night to relieve their bladder.

5) Experiment with food that could affect bladder function