A holistic approach to pediatric care in Frisco and Plano, Texas

Award winning, top rated Pediatrician serving Frisco, Plano, Allen and North Dallas


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14 Foods that Can Replace Pills

1. Bananas – Stress and anxiety

Next time you feel stressed, grab a banana! With an average of 105 calories and 14 grams of sugar, a banana will boost your blood-sugar levels and help combat hunger. Additionally, a banana contains 30% of your daily requirement of Vitamin B6, which helps your brain in the production of serotonin – a chemical that helps reduce stress.

2. Yogurt – Constipation and gas

One and a half cups of yogurt are packed full of probiotics that assist in digestion and improves the stomach’s ability to digest dairy and legumes – a major cause of gastric gasses.

3. Raisins – High blood pressure

A large handful of resins (approx. 60) contains over 200mg of potassium, as well as 1 gram of fiber. These are strongly recommended as part of a diet to help reduce blood pressure. Recent studies show that the polyphenols in grapes, raisins and wine, help maintain the circulatory system and reduce blood pressure.

4. Apricots – Kidney stones

4 dried apricots contain 2 grams of fiber, 235mg of potassium and just 3mg of sodium. This combination is highly effective at preventing minerals from getting trapped in your kidneys, which is the cause of the most common kidney stones.

5. Tuna – Foul mood

A can of tuna contains about 800mg of Omega-3, a fatty acid that is considered vital in the treatment of depression. Omega 3 is even an approved treatment for depression by the American Psychiatric Association.

6. Ginger tea – Nausea

A time-old proven treatment for nausea, ginger has also been scientifically proven to be helpful in dealing with nausea caused by motion sickness as well as morning sickness. It is as effective as anti-nausea medicine, but without the side effects (such as ‘cottonmouth’ and lethargy)

7. Basil – Indigestion

Studies suggest that the eugenol in basil is highly effective as a gastric painkiller, nausea reduction, cramping and diarrhea by eliminating bacteria Salmonella and Listeria. Basil is also effective at preventing halitosis.

8. Pears – High cholesterol

The average pear contains 5 grams of the dietary fiber Pectin, which helps clear the body of ‘bad cholesterol’ (LDL).

9. Cabbage – Stomach ulcers

In a research published by the John Hopkins Medical School, it was found that the sulforaphane in cabbage helps battle the helicobacter pylori bacteria (a main cause for ulcers). It is believed that sulforaphane may also help prevent gastric tumors.

10. Figs – Hemorrhoids

Dried figs are rich in dietary fiber, which in turn, produce softer feces and aiding in reducing hemorrhoids.

11. Potatoes – Headaches

A medium-sized potato contains 37 carbohydrates, which help reduce headaches by increasing serotonin production in the brain.

12. Garlic – Yeast infection

Garlic contains many essential oils that help prevent the development of yeast infections.

13. Chamomile tea – Heartburn

A great treatment for gastric inflammation, cramping, heartburn and gas, is mixing 2 teaspoons of chamomile tea in a cup of boiling water and brewing it for about 20 minutes and then drinking it.

14. Orange juice – Lethargy

The fructose in orange juice is a natural and fast-working stimulant, and research has proven the ability of Vitamin C to reduce damage caused by free radicals and provide the body with energy. Vitamin C is also a key factor in maintaining iron levels in our blood, which keeps it oxygenated.


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TREATING DANDRUFF NATURALLY

WHAT IS DANDRUFF?

Dandruff is a condition of the scalp that causes flakes of skin to appear. Dandruff is a common condition, which is marked by flaking and itching.

Dry Scalp is not Dandruff. Some people think their dandruff is caused by their scalp being too dry. They try to deal with this by not washing their hair with shampoo, or wash it less often, believing that washing worsens the problem. This is a myth.

SOME STATS

It is estimated that about 50% of people in Western Europe and North America suffer from dandruff.
Dandruff is more common in men than in women, and in people with oily skin.

People with dry skin tend to get dandruff more often.

CAUSES

People who do not comb or brush their hair regularly have a slightly higher risk of having dandruff – this is because they are not aiding the shedding of skin that combing or brushing provides.

Excessive flaking may be caused by an underlying illness or condition, such as psoriasis, a fungal infection (Malassezia), seborrheic dermatitis, or even head lice.

Some people react to some hair care products with a red, itchy, scaling scalp.

Some experts say that people who do not consume enough foods that contain zinc, B vitamins, and some types of fats are more prone to dandruff.

Cradle Cap – dandruff in babies

Cradle Cap may appear when the baby is between 2 weeks and 6 months of age, especially between the ages of 3 to 8 weeks – this usually disappears after a few weeks; in some cases it may take months. Although cradle cap may be alarming to parents, it is not dangerous.

NATURAL REMEDIES FOR DANDRUFF

· Apple cider vinegar: The acidity of apple cider vinegar changes the pH of your scalp, making it harder for yeast to grow. This helps in reducing dandruff.

· Neem Leaves: Neem leaves (also an Indian herb) make a great all-natural home remedy for your dandruff. Their properties not only relieve itching, they act as an antifungal as well, inhibiting the over-growth of dandruff causing fungus.

· Baking soda: Wet your hair and then rub a handful of baking soda vigorously into your scalp. Don’t use shampoo. Baking soda reduces fungi that can cause dandruff.

· Listerine: Listerine fights fungus

· Fenugreek Paste: Soak the seeds in 1-2 cups of water overnight. The next morning, grind them into a fine paste and apply to your scalp. Leave it applied for 30-45 minutes, then wash with mild shampoo or water.

· Coconut oil: Massage 3-5 tablespoons of coconut oil into your scalp and leave it for a while. Wash off the oil with a mild shampoo.

· Lemon: Massage 2 tablespoons of lemon juice into your scalp and rinse with water. Then stir 1 teaspoon lemon juice into 1 cup water and rinse your hair with it after shampooing. Let the lemon water be the last rinse. Lemon’s acidity helps balance the pH of your scalp, which helps keeps dandruff at bay.

· Garlic: Garlic’s anti-fungal properties are perfect for eliminating dandruff-causing bacteria. Massage your scalp with crushed garlic and honey before washing.

· Tea Tree Oil: Pour 1 tablespoon of tea tree oil into 1 cup of warm water in a squirt bottle. Shake well. After shampooing, spray the mixture all over your scalp, massage, and let it sit for a couple of minutes. Pat the excess moisture out, but don’t wash it out.

· Aloe Vera Gel: Apply Aloe Vera gel to the scalp 15 minutes prior to washing your hair. After 15 minutes, shampoo and wash it as normal.


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ANOTHER VICTORY TO THE NATURAL MOVEMENT

Back to our roots we go.

You may recall that last month we posted that Subway will remove an additive from its bread. And Gatorade was removing BVO from its sports drink.

And Chick-fil-A made a series of highly publicized menu tweaks early this year, removing artificial dyes from some of its dipping sauces and committing to a switch to antibiotic-free chicken within the next five years.

Now it is Panera’s turn. The restaurant-café chain will remove all artificial additives from its menu by 2016. That means no dyes, no preservatives, and no artificial sweeteners in any Panera restaurant-café offerings.

This follows Chipotle’s earlier commitment to naturally fresh ingredients.

It is getting bit easier to eat out now.


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PROS ON PROBIOTICS FOR YOUR KIDS

Is Probiotics a hype?

What are probiotics?

Probiotics are “friendly bacteria” that are similar to organisms that occur naturally in the digestive tract. Probiotics are the good bacteria that live in our gut. We have trillions of bacteria in our colon, including over 1,000 different types, with most of them being beneficial. “As long as we maintain a high ratio of good to bad, the bad bacteria behave,” says Dr.Shekhar Challa. “The problem occurs when this ratio gets out of whack.” He adds, “probiotics have long been used in Japan, China and India and it is new buzzword in the United States.

“In societies with very good hygiene, we have seen a sharp increase in autoimmune and allergic diseases,” Guandalini tells. “That may be because the immune system isn’t being properly challenged by pathogenic organisms. Introducing friendly bacteria in the form of probiotics is believed to challenge the immune system in healthy ways.”

Benefits of Probiotics

In 2011, the experts at Yale University reviewed the research on probiotics. They concluded that probiotics are most effective for:

· Treating childhood diarrhea.

· Treating ulcerative colitis.

· Treating necrotizing enterocolitis a type of infection and inflammation of the intestine mostly seen in infants.

· Preventing antibiotic-associated diarrhea and infectious diarrhea.

· Preventing pouchitis, an inflammation of the intestine that can follow intestinal surgery.

· Treating and preventing eczema associated with cow’s milk allergy.

· Helping the immune system.

The Yale University panel experts concluded that probiotics may be helpful in other ways although evidence is less convincing. These include,

· Treating symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome.

· Treating vaginitis.

· Treating diarrhea caused by C.difficile bacteria.

Probiotics may also be useful in unexpected ways. A study published in 2010 suggested that probiotics may lower the risk of common childhood illness such as ear infection, strep throat and colds. Certain types of probiotics have been linked to helping with irritable bowel syndrome to traveler’s diarrhea to boosting the immune system. They’re sometimes used in antibiotics to combat the diarrhea that may result from taking antibiotics.

Research in Probiotics

Reviewing the current medical literature, the authors report that:

· Infants and children who ate probiotic foods — mainly yogurt experienced a shorter duration of diarrhea.

· Probiotics were modestly effective in preventing antibiotic-associated diarrhea in healthy children.

· There is no conclusive evidence to suggest probiotics treat intestinal conditions, such as Crohn’s disease, irritable bowel syndrome, or constipation, as well as colic, and allergies in children.

· Infant formulas enhanced with probiotics or prebiotics do not appear to cause harm in healthy infants, but there is insufficient evidence to suggest any benefits.

· Prebiotics may help reduce atopic eczema in healthy children.

· It’s unclear if probiotics or prebiotics offer any long-term protection against allergies.

What is better: Probiotic foods or supplements?

Probiotics are considered dietary supplements, which are not regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Probiotics come in many forms, including powders, tablets, capsules and foods such as, yogurts and dairy drinks. The forms you take them in don’t matter, experts say, as long as it contains enough organisms to grow in the intestines. Experts say the effective dose varies, from as little as 50 million to as many as 1 trillion live cells per dose.

What is also important is the type of organisms they contain. Specific probiotic organisms appear to be useful for particular illnesses. The bacteria Lactobacillus G, Lactobacillus reuteri and the yeast Saccharomyces boulcardii have been shown to be helpful for infectious diarrhea in children, for example.

Your best bet, choose a low-fat, low-sugar Yogurt with live, active cultures. Personally, we use a lot of probiotics in our kid’s diet. We make our own yogurt at home. If you want to know how you can make your own, ask me on your next visit.


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TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Part 5

(DISCLAIMER: This is NOT a medical advice nor does it substitute for one. These are home remedies that has worked for us. Please consult your child’s doctor before you try them at your own risk.)

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: NOSE BLEED

1) Set upright and lean forward

2) Pinch your nose and breath through your mouth

3) Avoid hard blowing of nose

4) To prevent, increase humidity with a Humidifier or OTC saline spray

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Pink Eye

1) Use a warm moist compress over closed eyes multiple times. If allergy sis the reason, use a cool compress

2) Wash hands to avoid spreading.

3) Avoid cosmetics and contacts

4) See doctor to see if it is bacterial or allergic pink eye

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Poison Ivy

1) Wash immediately every where and all clothes

2) Do not scratch. Use OTC calamine lotion or hydrocortisone

3) Use oatmeal bath and cool water bath

4) Cover open blister with gauze

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Stomach flu

1) Eat less and sample ice chips or drink electrolyte. Avoid apple juice and instead try Pedialyte

2) Gradually get back to regular food. Avoid fatty or spicy food. Use simple starch like rice, cracker, banana

3) Take rest and avoid pain killers.

4) Check out with doctor to see if it could be food poisoning

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Sun burn

1) Apply cool moist compress

2) Use moisturizers. Avoid any –caine OTC drugs. Instead use aloe vera or 1% hydrocortisone. Try non-aspirin anti-inflamatory medicines

3) Rehydrate

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Body odor for teens

1) Take bath daily and use natural fiber clothes

2) Dry your feet . Use athletic socks

3) Use perfume free deodorant (not antiperspirant)

4) Try changing diet

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Swimmers ears for older kids, (not infant)

1) Home remedy – mix 1 part white vinegar and 1 part rubbing alcohol and apply 1 tsp and drain before and after swim to prevent bacteria and fungus growth

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Teething for babies

1) Massage baby’s gums

2) Use teething toys

3) Use cool wash cloth dry drools

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Tick bite

1) Wear long sleeve shirt and pants. Keep yard clear of brush and leaves. Use insect repellant.

2) If bitten, remove tick using tweezer over the tick’s head. Wash the area after

3) See doctor to rule out other diseases like Lyme, rocky mountain spotted fever etc.


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TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Part 4

(DISCLAIMER: This is NOT a medical advice nor does it substitute for one. These are home remedies that has worked for us. Please consult your child’s doctor before you try them at your own risk.)

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Ear Infection

1) Start with an OTC pain killer

2) Moist warm compress over ears helps

3) Cuddle and distract baby

4) Most ear infection resolve without an antibiotic but if it is recurrent or kid is <2ys you may need it

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Eczema or Dry skin

1) Try to find the irritant that triggers it (like cloth, soap, detergent etc)

2) Apply calamine lotion or 1% hydrocortisone

3) Avoid itching with a bandage

4) Use a cool moist compress

5) Take an colloidal oatmeal + baking soda bath.

6) Moisturize the skin (after bath) with strong OTC creams like Eucerin, Neutragena or baby oil

7) Avoid non-moisturizing soap

8) Use a humidifier

9) Use a humidifier

10) Use cotton or silk clothes (no wool or acrylic)

11) I have seen some use ½ cup bleach in a bathtub full of water. Soaking in it apparently kills the bacteria on skin. Use this only for older kids

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Eye Sty

1) Leave it alone and don’t pop it

2) Apply warm compress as many times as possible

3) To prevent, avoid old cosmetics, thoroughly cleaning any contact lens and washing hands

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Flu

1) Drink lots of electrolytes

2) Take rest and use non-aspirin pain medicines

3) To prevent, get whole family vaccinated

4) Wash hands or use the hand-gel

5) Eat lots of immune building veggies and fruits

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Headache (for older kids only)

1) For tension head ache, try massage, shower, relaxation, low dose pain killer, some exercise

2) Eucalyptus or peppermint oil helps ease pain

3) For migraine, try going to sleep in a dark room, meditation, relaxing music or yoga

4) Promising research is being done on herbs like feverfew and butterbur, high dose B-2, magnesium supplements and Coenzyme Q10

5) Some older kids coffee caffeine may help

6) For frequent headache, keep track of triggers and avoid it

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Hives

1) Record and identify trigger – like food, medicine, pollen, pet, insect sting or latex

2) Use OTC antihistamine to minimize itching

3) Use a cool moist compress and bandage to cover

4) Take a cool bath and wear soft natural fiber clothes

5) Try oatmeal bath

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Indigestion (for older kids, not infant)

1) Eat less and chew your food

2) Eat more easily digestible food like fruits and veggies. Avoid soda, spicy or fatty food

3) Exercise

4) Drink peppermint tea

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Jammed finger (for older kids, not infant)

1) Use ice pack

2) Keep your hand elevated

3) Use a buddy tape over injured and adjacent finger

4) If pain doesn’t subside, check out if finger is broken/cracked or bent

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Nausea/Vomiting in infants

1) In babies a little spit is not vomiting. Vomit is forceful. So give baby’s stomach a rest,

2) Give small sips to avoid dehydration

3) Try oral electrolyte


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TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Part 3

(DISCLAIMER: This is NOT a medical advice nor does it substitute for one. These are home remedies that has worked for us. Please consult your child’s doctor before you try them at your own risk.)

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: COUGH

1) Drink plenty of fluid (AVOID sodas)

2) Use a humidifier

3) Try lozenges for bigger kids

4) Honey or turmeric in warm milk helps the throat

5) Elevate head with more pillows

6) Avoid cough syrups

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Croup

1) Cuddle or distract child

2) Use cool-mist humidifier

3) Hold kid in upright position

4) Give fluids and plenty of rest

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Dandruff

1) Use anti-dandruff organic shampoo

2) If severe try medicated shampoo

3) Avoid any chemicals on hair

4) Expose head to sunlight

5) Try tea tree oil. Tea tree oil is antiseptic, antibiotic, & antifungal.

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Diaper rash

1) Change diaper frequently

2) Use warm water to clean (AVOID wipes)

3) Try zinc oxide

4) Keep it aerated/open without diaper for a while

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Diarrhea

1) Drink clear liquids (not fruit juices)

2) Add semi solid or low fiber food (like cracker, egg, rice)

3) Avoid dairy products, caffeine

4) Try probiotic yogurt or soy drinks

5) Be very careful when it is infants

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Dry eyes

1) Blink often

2) Avoid rubbing eyes

3) Try OTC artificial tears

4) Use a humidifier

5) Wear glasses to avoid wind

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Dry Skin

1) Keep baths to 15 min or less

2) Moisturize the skin (after bath) with strong OTC creams like Eucerin, Neutragena or baby oil

3) Avoid non-moisturizing soap

4) Use a humidifier

5) Use cotton or silk clothes

6) Avoid itching (may use 1% Hydrocortisone)


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TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Part 2

(DISCLAIMER: This is NOT a medical advice nor does it substitute for one. These are home remedies that has worked for us. Please consult your child’s doctor before you try them at your own risk.)

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: BRONCHITIS IN OLDER KIDS

1) Avoid 2nd hand smoke and exposure to irritants like paints/cleaners

2) Use a humidifier

3) Consider face mask for outside cold air

4) Try a different breathing method – take a deep breath, then slowly breath out through mouth (in kissing pose). Repeat. This develops lungs.

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: BRUISE

1) Elevate injured area

2) Apply cold pack/compress

3) Rest

4) Use OTC painkillers

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: BURNS

1) Immerse in cool water (NOT ice)

2) Use burn gel

3) Use a sterile gauze bandage

4) Take OTC painkiller

5) Don’t break blister

6) Watch for infection

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Ulcer in mouth/Canker sore

1) Apply ice

2) Rinse with salt water

3) Brush gently

4) Try milk of magnesia

5) Use OTC oragel or anbesol

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Colic

1) Try feeding the baby or giving pacifier

2) Cuddle

3) Gently rock or take a car drive

4) Use white noise in background

5) Softly massage the tummy area

6) Consider dietary/formula changes

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Common cold

1) Drink lot of fluid

2) Try chicken soup

3) Use a cool mist humidifier

4) Gargle with warm salt water

5) Use nasal saline drops & bulb suction of nose

6) Get vitamin C or Zinc

7) Get rest

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Constipation

1) Eat more veggies and fruits (especially fibrous prunes, beans, fig etc)

2) Dink lots of water

3) Increase physical activity

4) Try warm bath for small kids and stimulation to anal area

5) Avoid non fibrous food like cheese, milk and meats or processed food


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TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: Part 1

(DISCLAIMER: This is NOT a medical advice nor does it substitute for one. These are home remedies that has worked for us. Please consult your child’s doctor before you try them at your own risk.)

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: ACNE IN TEENS

1) Avoid greasy or oily cosmetics

2) Keep your face clean (including hair)

3) Get enough sleep to reduce stress

4) Don’t pick on blemishes

5) Use 5% Tea tree oil gel (has same effect as Benzoyl Peroxide) but NOT if you have Acne Rosacea

6) Zinc supplements helps wound healing

7) Naturally occurring glycolic acid (in sugar cane) helps unclog pores

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: AIRPLANE EARS

1) For infant or young kids – give fluid or pacifier during takeoff and landing. Don’t give decongestants.

2) Look for specially design earplugs that slowly equalize pressure

3) For kids – suck candy or chew gum which helps open the Eustachian tube.

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: SPRING or FALL ALLERGIES

1) Rise out your sinuses

2) Wash immediately after you come inside

3) Keep windows and doors closed in allergy season

4) Use HEPA filter.

5) Use allergen/dust blocking pillow and mattress

6) Keep indoor humidity between 30-50%

7) Wash or change air filters often

8) Avoid pets with fur/feather

9) Bath pets frequently

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: ASTHMA

1) Keep a dairy and avoid allergens that might cause symptoms (e.g. pets, particular food)

2) Clean the auto and home air filters in A/C or heater

3) Clean home and bed weekly

4) Avoid 2nd hand smoke

5) Exercise moderately (not heavy)

6) Maintain your child’s weight

7) Control the heartburn. Reflux is known to cause breathing issues.

TIP FOR MANAGING AN AILING CHILD: BED WETTING IN OLDER KIDS

1) Don’t worry. Most kids will outgrow it.

2) Limit your child ‘s fluid intake in the evening

3) Treat constipation if any

4) Initially wake them up once in the middle of the night to relieve their bladder.

5) Experiment with food that could affect bladder function


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HOME REMEDY FOR COMMON AILMENTS (1)

  1. HONEY: chapped, cracked lips & cold sores in mouth. Research found that honey helps heal minor to moderate burns, and a recent Dutch study identified a protein called defensin-1 that gives the goo its antibacterial action.
  2. SALT: Sinus congestion, sore throat. For a sore throat, dissolve half a teaspoon of non-iodized salt in an 8-ounce glass of water, and simply gargle the water. To flush out your sinuses, fill a clean squeeze bottle or neti pot with the solution, lean over a sink, and squeeze or pour it into your nostril. Use only sterile bottled or tap water that has been boiled and then cooled, in your nose.
  3. PEPPERMINT TEA: Indigestion, stomachache. The oil found in the peppermint leaf and its stems calms the muscles of the digestive tract, allowing gas to pass more easily and relieving indigestion. Steer clear of peppermint tea, though, if your pain is caused by reflux—you’ll know from the acidic, burning feeling in your chest.
  4. OATMEAL: Eczema, sunburn, hives. Oats pack phytochemicals with anti-inflammatory properties that soothe itchy and inflamed skin, a study in the Archives of Dermatological Research shows. If you’re using regular oatmeal, grind it into a fine powder.
  5. OLIVE OIL: Dry skin. When your skin feels extra parched, you can dab a thin layer of organic extra-virgin olive oil under your moisturizer for an extra dose of antioxidants and good fatty acids.
  6. MUSIC: Music activates sensory pathways that compete with pain pathways. Research shows that music is especially effective for palliative care and cancer pain.
  7. DOGS: 10 to 15 minutes of interaction between pain-clinic patients and therapy dogs reduced patients’ chronic pain — and the benefits seemed to last for hours.
  8. BREATHING: slow breathing significantly reduced pain perception and negative emotions. Slow, deep breathing is the simplest form. Breathe in deeply on the syllable re, then exhale on the syllable lax. Keep repeating.
  9. MEAT TENDERIZER; Bee stings, nonpoisonous spider bites. Meat tenderizer contains papain, an enzyme that breaks down proteins (like the ones in your T-bone steak). But papain can also break down toxins from bug bites and cut back on itching. Use tenderizer only on mosquito bites, bee stings, and nonpoisonous spider bites. If the child experience symptoms such as nausea, difficulty breathing, or cramping in your abs or lower back, seek medical help immediately.

Source: http://www.health.com